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Lang Looks to Downsize

BY Lorenzo Perez, J. Andrew Curliss, Aisling Swift
05/31/2003
by Lorenzo Perez, J. Andrew Curliss, Aisling Swift on 5/31/03.

If you're in the market for a pink, lakeside mansion in Cary,
give Mayor Glen Lang a call.
With his eldest son entering his senior year of high school
and preparing to leave home for college, Lang said Friday he and
his wife are looking to downsize to someplace smaller.
"As the kids leave, we'll need a lot less space," Lang said.
The home has 6,600 square feet of heated space, according to
Wake County real estate records. That might be more than most
families need, but Lang said he has already gotten a few nibbles.
It's listed at about $ 1.4 million, Lang said, so he expects it
will take at least a few months to sell.
The mayor insisted he has no plans to move out of Cary.
"I'm not going anywhere," he said.
HIGH SCHOOL DAYS: Raleigh City Council member Philip Isley
headed home this weekend, where he'll add some circumstance to
the pomp of his high school's graduation. Isley is the
commencement speaker.
He was polishing his speech Friday for graduates of the
private Carlisle School in his hometown of Martinsville, Va., and
it got him to thinking of his experience there. Since 1974, every
student at the school has been accepted to a college or
university and the academics are rigorous, he said.
"We were learning a foreign language in the third grade,"
Isley said. "We made speeches in the sixth, seventh and 12th
grades."
He said Latin and Greek mythology were other subjects.
"I don't use my Latin," he said. "But if I ever made it onto
'Jeopardy!,' I'd be hell on Greek mythology."
BUSY SIGNAL: The Durham County District Attorney's Office has
found a way to handle calls from the media whenever a
high-profile case comes its way.
When anyone phones the main number, they are greeted with this
message: "We are experiencing a high volume of calls. Please try
your call again."
And if you call the number for District Attorney Jim Hardin's
secretary, she will politely transfer you to that recording.
It's the same recording the media hears every time there's a
high-profile case, and on Friday, when the body of missing
cellist Janine Sutphen was identified, the office dusted off the
recording again.
POLITICAL TRAIL
- THE JOHNSTON COUNTY DEMOCRATIC PARTY'S executive committee
will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday at the Johnston Central Alumni
Center, 1002 Massey St. in Smithfield.
- AMERICANS MAKING A DIFFERENCE, a nonprofit civic education
group, plans to hold a roundtable discussion on why many young
people don't participate in politics. The event will be at 6 p.m.
Wednesday in the auditorium of Richard B. Harrison Library, 1313
New Bern Ave. in Raleigh.
- WAKE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS JOE BRYAN AND TONY GURLEY, along
with County Manager David Cooke, will discuss the proposed county
budget with the Wake chapter of N.C. Citizens for a Sound Economy
at 7 p.m. Thursday at N.C. State University's McKimmon Center at
the corner of Gorman Street and Western Boulevard in Raleigh.
- THE WESTERN WAKE REPUBLICAN CLUB will hold its annual BBQ
from noon to 3 p.m. June 7 at Apex Community Park.