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IRS IS TAKEN TO TASK FOR “PERVASIVE MATERIAL WEAKNESSES” IN NEW AUDIT OF THE TAX COLLECTING AGENCY.
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Press Release

IRS IS TAKEN TO TASK FOR “PERVASIVE MATERIAL WEAKNESSES” IN NEW AUDIT OF THE TAX COLLECTING AGENCY.

“Scrap the Code” advocates see audit as further proof that America needs tax simplification. The Government Accounting Office (GAO) testified before Congress February 29 to deliver a stunning report on its 1999 audit of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). The GAO concludes, “serious internal control issues continued to affect IRS’ management of unpaid assessments.”

03/02/2000
Government Waste Rampant, According to New Report
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Press Release

Government Waste Rampant, According to New Report

A new report by the House Budget Committee Majority details longstanding waste throughout the federal government. The report, "Reviving the Reform Agenda," aims to renew congressional focus on accountability in the spending of taxpayer dollars. According to the report “Federal programs continue to waste billions of dollars annually through longstanding, systemic problems that persist – and in some cases are growing worse – despite repeated warnings from the Government’s principal watchdogs, the General Accounting Office [GAO] and the inspectors general [IG] of government agencies.”

03/02/2000
A Citizen's Guide to the Death Tax
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Press Release

A Citizen's Guide to the Death Tax

Federal politicians’ insatiable desire to tax private citizens is nowhere more clearly demonstrated than in the spectacle of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) seizing taxes that are owed for no other reason than the fact that an American has died. Whether they are called federal “transfer taxes,” “estate taxes” or “death taxes,” they amount to the same thing: the government seizing American citizens’ property at their death instead of allowing them to pass a legacy on to family or other loved ones as they see fit.

03/01/2000
Making Sense of Insurance: A Consumer Guide to Regulatory Reform
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Press Release

Making Sense of Insurance: A Consumer Guide to Regulatory Reform

Life, it is said, is full of uncertainties. Most of us prefer it that way. The business of living would be awfully dull if we knew in advance everything that was going to happen to us. Indeed, many of life’s greatest pleasures come in the form of surprises — and it is often the element of surprise that provides much of the joy and excitement we feel when something good happens. But uncertainty has its downside as well. Some of the surprises that a person experiences in life are anything but pleasant. The unplanned events that we refer to as “accidents” fit into this category — things ranging from a house fire, to a car crash, to a slip on an icy sidewalk. Natural calamities — such as hurricanes, floods, and earthquakes — that devastate our homes and communities are also among the surprises that most of us would just as soon do without. The same can be said for illness and disease.

03/01/2000
A Citizen's Guide to Social Security
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Press Release

A Citizen's Guide to Social Security

In the 1930s, the effects of the Great Depression were still being felt in America. President Roosevelt favored using the federal government to address unemployment, poverty, and other social ills of the time. The Social Security program was, in fact, a 1930s solution to a 1930s situation. Initially financed by a mere 2-percent tax on the first $3,000 of a worker's income, 200,000 retirees were paid an average $58 a year by the government-run program in its first three years.

03/01/2000
What is Washington Doing to Your Medicare?
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Press Release

What is Washington Doing to Your Medicare?

Like a lot of things these days, health care for the elderly and disabled is getting more complicated. This booklet explains the basics of Medicare, the problems now facing Medicare and ways to fix the program. Although this easy-to-read guide won’t answer all your questions about Medicare, it will help health care consumers and taxpayers understand the consequences of government-run solutions versus the benefits of a consumer-based Medicare system.

03/01/2000
America Demands Customer Choice in Electricity
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Press Release

America Demands Customer Choice in Electricity

Do you remember choosing your power company? Probably not, because you had no say in the matter. Unfortunately, when it comes to electricity, there is no customer choice—your only option is the local government approved and protected monopoly. In other industries, competition keeps prices low and service reliable. But electric power is the last major industry where there is no competition, and because of that, many customers pay too much. Facing high costs and poor service, what can consumers do—live without power?

03/01/2000
CSE and CEI Letter to the FCC on the Bell Atlantic GTE Merger
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Press Release

CSE and CEI Letter to the FCC on the Bell Atlantic GTE Merger

The letter reads: The Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) and Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation (CSE Foundation) hereby submit these comments in favor of the application of Bell Atlantic and GTE to transfer control of certain licenses pursuant to a proposed acquisition of GTE by Bell Atlantic.

03/01/2000
Breaking Down the Barriers to Competition: A Brighter Future for Telecommunications
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Press Release

Breaking Down the Barriers to Competition: A Brighter Future for Telecommunications

Most Americans now have more than a decade of experience with telephone competition, paying a lot less for much more. Long-distance phone calls cost half as much now as they did before competition, and there are hundreds more telephone products available to use at home, in the car, at the office or just about anywhere. Price cuts and diverse choices could soon come to local phone service and video services as well – if lawyers, regulators and politicians don’t get in the way.

03/01/2000
Removing Government Roadblocks: Opening the Road to a High-Tech Future
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Press Release

Removing Government Roadblocks: Opening the Road to a High-Tech Future

High technology promises to give Americans better and faster products and services, yet government seems to limit innovation at every turn. Whether through taxation, regulation, or litigation, government just can’t keeps its hands off of high technology. Across the nation, federal, state, and local governments seem bent on stunting the development of telecommunications, software, and computer hardware. They do this for several reasons: Bureaucrats think they can “promote competition” by penalizing firms that compete too aggressively and successfully.

03/01/2000

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