Contact FreedomWorks

400 North Capitol Street, NW
Suite 765
Washington, DC 20001

  • Toll Free 1.888.564.6273
  • Local 202.783.3870

Money-Bomb - 100 Days - Nov 2016

Money-Bomb - 100 Days - Nov 2016

Help us reach $100,000 to pass a
CONSERVATIVE AGENDA

All the Latest

    Everything
  • Blog
  • Events
  • Press
  • Key Votes
  • Podcasts
  • Videos
  • Tweets
  • Photos

In Action

Microsoft to Pay Dividends for the First Time
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Microsoft to Pay Dividends for the First Time

BY Ariana Eunjung Cha

Microsoft Corp. said yesterday that it will issue dividend checks to common stockholders for the first time, a surprise move signaling that the software giant believes its expensive antitrust troubles are coming to an end. Company officials said the board unanimously approved an annual dividend of 16 cents per share. The Redmond, Wash.-based company had previously responded to grumbling by investors about its cash reserves of more than $40 billion by saying it needed to keep the funds because of the uncertainty in its court cases, among other reasons.

01/17/2003
BUCHANAN AND PRESS For January 17, 2003
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

BUCHANAN AND PRESS For January 17, 2003

BY Pat Buchanan; Bill Press; Sam Shane; Fred Francis; Ron Insana

01/17/2003
State Ranks 2nd in Multiple-Payout Doctors
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

State Ranks 2nd in Multiple-Payout Doctors

From the Charleston Gazette January 17, 2003, Friday Copyright 2003 Charleston Newspapers West Virginia ranks second in the country in the percentage of doctors who repeatedly have settled or lost malpractice lawsuits, according to a national consumer group. Since 1990, one in 10 state doctors made two or more payouts to alleged victims of medical malpractice, according to Dr. Sidney Wolfe of Public Citizen. Only Pennsylvania had a higher rate of physicians making multiple payouts.

01/17/2003
Before it's too late, stop the TTA's misguided commuter rail project
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Before it's too late, stop the TTA's misguided commuter rail project

This letter to the editor appeared in the Raleigh News & Observer on January, 17, 2003

01/17/2003
Pelosi brings pedigree to new post as Congress' most powerful woman
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Pelosi brings pedigree to new post as Congress' most powerful woman

BY JUSTIN PRITCHARD

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) - Nancy Pelosi loves old maps - graphic testimony to the spirit of exploration, faded images of what was known and unknown. "Maps are about the places and the geography and the Earth, but they're also about how people saw the world and the courage it took for them to go places," she says. "What we want to do in politics is blaze trails and not just follow paths."

01/16/2003
U.S., Singapore Wrap Up Free-Trade Deal
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

U.S., Singapore Wrap Up Free-Trade Deal

The Bush administration announced Wednesday it had cleared away the last hurdle to a free-trade agreement with Singapore, wrapping up the deal a month after a similar one with Chile, the Associated Press reported. Administration officials said a final round of telephone negotiations between Treasury Undersecretary John Taylor and Koh Yong Guan, managing director of Singapore's monetary authority, resolved the lone sticking point: treatment of capital flows during periods of financial crises. Under the deal, Singapore may impose capital controls if it deems them necessary, but U.S. investors may file claims to recoup any investments trapped in Singapore. The administration hopes to use agreements with Chile, Singapore and other countries to give momentum to the negotiations on even bigger prizes: a deal covering all countries except Cuba in the Western Hemisphere, and new global trade talks covering the 144 nations in the World Trade Organization. The deal with Singapore would wipe out tariffs and other trade barriers on about $33 billion in merchandise trade between the two nations. It also would give U.S. banks and service companies more access to one of Asia's main financial centers. Meanwhile, President Bush, who has tried to lure organized labor into the Republicans' political camp, Wednesday named Teamsters' President James Hoffa to an administration advisory panel on trade. Bush also named Paul Beckner, president of Citizens for a Sound Economy, a group that advocates lower taxes and less government, to a two-year term on the Advisory Committee for Trade Policy and Negotiations.

01/16/2003
Capital Comment for January 16, 2003
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Capital Comment for January 16, 2003

BY United Press International

Capital Comment -- Daily news notes, political rumors, and important events that shape politics and public policy in Washington and the world from United Press International. Hitting the ground running... The presidential campaign of Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kerry is off to a fast start. Moments before President George W. Bush was due to make an official statement of administration policy on the University of Michigan affirmative action case, Kerry's campaign released a strongly worded statement critical of Bush. "In their first significant opportunity to show a more inclusive side of the Republican Party, the Bush administration has decided to intervene and try to undermine Michigan's efforts. The Bush administration continues a disturbing pattern of using the rhetoric of diversity as a substitute for real progress on a civil rights agenda," Kerry's statement read. Bush announced that his administration would be filing a brief in support of the plaintiffs' contention that the University of Michigan unfairly considers the race of applicants in making decisions as to who will be admitted.

01/16/2003
CSE to Gov. Wise: ‘Canadian-Style Health Care Isn’t the Answer’
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

CSE to Gov. Wise: ‘Canadian-Style Health Care Isn’t the Answer’

Faced with a Medicaid-driven budget crisis, Governor Bob Wise is demanding “Canadian prices” on pharmaceuticals sold in West Virginia. Yet, if Governor Wise looked further at the Canadian system, he’d realize that Canadian-style health care is a prescription for disaster. That’s why Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) on Friday is kicking off a statewide education campaign to stop Gov. Wise’s plans. As part of its campaign, CSE is launching a series of radio ads across the state and sending “Canadian Healthcare First Aid Kits” to state legislators and the Governor.

01/16/2003
U.S., Singapore Wrap Up Free-Trade Deal
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

U.S., Singapore Wrap Up Free-Trade Deal

The Bush administration announced Wednesday it had cleared away the last hurdle to a free-trade agreement with Singapore, wrapping up the deal a month after a similar one with Chile, the Associated Press reported. Administration officials said a final round of telephone negotiations between Treasury Undersecretary John Taylor and Koh Yong Guan, managing director of Singapore's monetary authority, resolved the lone sticking point: treatment of capital flows during periods of financial crises. Under the deal, Singapore may impose capital controls if it deems them necessary, but U.S. investors may file claims to recoup any investments trapped in Singapore. The administration hopes to use agreements with Chile, Singapore and other countries to give momentum to the negotiations on even bigger prizes: a deal covering all countries except Cuba in the Western Hemisphere, and new global trade talks covering the 144 nations in the World Trade Organization. The deal with Singapore would wipe out tariffs and other trade barriers on about $33 billion in merchandise trade between the two nations. It also would give U.S. banks and service companies more access to one of Asia's main financial centers. Meanwhile, President Bush, who has tried to lure organized labor into the Republicans' political camp, Wednesday named Teamsters' President James Hoffa to an administration advisory panel on trade. Bush also named Paul Beckner, president of Citizens for a Sound Economy, a group that advocates lower taxes and less government, to a two-year term on the Advisory Committee for Trade Policy and Negotiations.

01/16/2003
UPI's Capital Comment
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

UPI's Capital Comment

Capital Comment -- Daily news notes, political rumors, and important events that shape politics and public policy in Washington and the world from United Press International. Hitting the ground running... The presidential campaign of Massachusetts Sen. John F. Kerry is off to a fast start. Moments before President George W. Bush was due to make an official statement of administration policy on the University of Michigan affirmative action case, Kerry's campaign released a strongly worded statement critical of Bush. "In their first significant opportunity to show a more inclusive side of the Republican Party, the Bush administration has decided to intervene and try to undermine Michigan's efforts. The Bush administration continues a disturbing pattern of using the rhetoric of diversity as a substitute for real progress on a civil rights agenda," Kerry's statement read. Bush announced that his administration would be filing a brief in support of the plaintiffs' contention that the University of Michigan unfairly considers the race of applicants in making decisions as to who will be admitted.

01/16/2003

Pages