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Double Duty
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Double Duty

BY Doug Fernandes

Their seasons of Friday night glory have flickered into darkness. Chris Kinnan, Keith DuBose, Todd Huber and Rick McIntire were among the area's best and brightest, a marriage of scholar's intellect with athletic wherewithal. A formidable combination, for it's spawned success where starched shirts and silk ties are the norm for the four former high school stars who are quick to credit football for principles learned and adopted. "There is a finite period of time," said Kinnan, "and you've got to have your eye on the bigger picture. You learn that the lessons of sports prepare you a lot for what you do academically and the way you relate to people. "When the going gets tough, you've been there before, and I draw on these lessons." The son of ex-Manatee Community College basketball coach Harry Kinnan, the nephew of former Manatee High football coach Joe Kinnan, 30-year-old Chris Kinnan works in Washington, D.C., as director of Internet communications for Citizens for a Sound Economy. The organization's mission is to "recruit, educate, train and mobilize hundreds of thousands of volunteer activists to fight for less government, lower taxes and more freedom." Given Kinnan's background, the job makes sense. Following graduation from Manatee High in 1990, one year after playing offensive tackle on the 'Canes' state title team, Kinnan, a National Merit finalist at Manatee, majored in politics and economics at Princeton University. He played two years for the Tigers, getting his degree in 1994. From there, Kinnan matriculated to the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Asia's top business school. Within three years, Kinnan earned an international MBA. "It was a terrific educational opportunity," he said. "Being from Bradenton, I wanted to get the international perspective. But it really makes you appreciate the USA." A job on Capitol Hill beckoned, working for Congressman Dan Miller. Three years later, the Sony Corporation hired Kinnan, where he worked in its online privacy department. But when the Internet bubble burst -- "It felt like giving up a sack" -- Kinnan joined his present employer. Rick McIntire, Sarasota High class of 1986, Sailor tight end and middle linebacker, knew the odds of becoming a pro were against him. So he took a surer route -- a Harvard education, a stint on Wall Street, a current job with Duestche Bank in London, trading metals. "When you're a trader, at the end of the day, you either have a profit or a loss," said McIntire, "and that mentality is the same as an athlete. You either win or lose." McIntire has been winning since graduating fourth in his Sailor senior class, the top male student. He signed a letter-of-intent to play at FSU, then scrapped it when Harvard opened its doors. He played football and baseball for the Crimson, earning a degree in American history. McIntire graduated in 1990, but put off the real world to play a year of semi-pro football in Barcelona, Spain. "It was a good transition year for any student coming out of four years of university life," he said. "It was a very young league and they were hungry and thirsty for anybody to speak the language." McIntire, 35, put down his helmet and picked up the Wall Street Journal. In 1992 he moved to New York City to trade energy options on the New York Mercantile Exchange. A year later, he joined Goldman Sachs to trade metals. After three years, he moved to Goldman's London office. He returned to New York for a year and a half, then headed back to London and landed with Duestche. As he spoke, McIntire was preparing to fly to South Africa for three days of meetings with clients. "Most people who go to work for a company, when you play a team sport, it does give a certain grounding for working in that environment," he said. Heading overseas wasn't necessary for Keith DuBose to find his vocational niche. Remaining in Sarasota sufficed, as an attorney for the firm of Matthews, Eastmoore, Hardy, Crauwels and Garcia, which handles commercial litigation, personal injury and medical malpractice. The DuBose name is well-known in Florida athletic circles. His brother, Jimmy, played running back for the Florida Gators, then the Tampa Bay Buccaneers from 1976-78. Keith starred for Booker High both on the field -- as the Tornado quarterback running the veer option and defensive back and in the classroom, graduating second out of 130 seniors in 1989. His 4.29 grade-point average paid off in an $80,000 full-ride scholarship to Duke. DuBose, a history major, played before the visor-obscured eyes of Steve Spurrier. His first year at Duke was Spurrier's last. DuBose played defensive back for the Blue Devils. Not quarterback. "Coach Spurrier wasn't going to run a veer offense," he said. After graduating from Duke, DuBose had a couple of pro workouts. He was even invited to the Eagles' camp. But Duke hit the skids after Spurrier left, "and football just wasn't as fun as it used to be. "At that point, it was one of the most difficult decisions I had to make. I had to say, 'Maybe I'm not as good as I think.' It was an adult decision." The decision led him to the Florida law school. DuBose got married in 1997, and the couple is expecting their first child next month. "I learned tremendous lessons from football," he said. "On a team concept, working well with others. We work as a team in a lot of different cases, and (football) helped me adjust to the pressure. Playing football was one of the biggest pressures." Todd Huber wants pressure. Savors it, actually. The kind of pressure from flying an F-18 Hornet at Mach 1.8-plus, nearly double the speed of sound. The kind of pressure that accompanies a dream of flying the space shuttle. From Manta Ray quarterback to American astronaut. For Huber, a 1990 Lemon Bay High graduate, class valedictorian and president, No. 1 in his class, the sky -- or, rather, outer space -- is the limit. "They pick somebody every other year," he said. "I would consider myself in the mix. It's not just fairly-tale land. I'm very serious about it. "The moment for me would probably be looking back at earth. That would be it." Being one of 10 fixed wing pilots at the prestigious Empire Test Pilot School in England would seem to confirm Huber's focus. He attends classes every morning, then flies the rest of the day. Last month he piloted 11 different planes. "As a test pilot," he said, "you should be able to jump into any type of plane." Huber has squeezed a lot of living into 30 years. As a young boy, he often stared up at the sky with his dad. "I remember him pointing up at the moon, saying, 'There's some guy up there,'" he said. "We'd fly to Florida from Michigan and I remember being enthralled by the jets." During the Manta Ray homecoming, Huber had the PA announcer inform the crowd of his intention to attend the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. "We lived on a street in Rotonda called Annapolis Lane," he said. "I was always interested in planes and space." With Sen. Bob Graham as his sponsor, Huber made the academy. He averaged 21 credit hours a semester, both military and academic studies, in addition to playing sprint football, which decrees that the participants weigh no more than 158 pounds 48 hours before the game. At the academy, Huber studied aerospace engineering. He spent a month on the amphibious assault ship USS Guam. He worked for a month on a submarine in Minneapolis. "It was the best food," he said. Huber was graduated in 1994, then went to work at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, in the space station program office. From there it was on to Stanford University and an aerospace engineering master's degree -- 45 credit hours -- earned in just nine months. "It was painful," he said. Then, in the summer of 1995, came the fun. Flight school in Pensacola and Meridian, Miss. Two years later, Huber had gotten his wings. He was a full-fledged naval aviator, having logged nearly 750 hours in the F-18. "It is very demanding," he said. "It's extremely rewarding but very, very demanding. I have never gotten out of the jet after a night (flight) without having my leg shaking. It's a combination of adrenaline and fatigue from working so hard." It all could pay off for Huber with the realization of a childhood dream.

08/30/2002
Indictments Target Three From State Board
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Indictments Target Three From State Board

BY Connie Mabin

Two members of the State Board of Education and one former member have been charged with violating the state's open meetings laws after an 18-month grand jury investigation. A Travis County grand jury Thursday indicted board members David Bradley, R-Beaumont, and Joe Bernal, D-San Antonio, and former board member Bob Offutt, R-San Antonio, on two misdemeanor charges. The elected board's responsibilities include managing the $17.4 billion Permanent School Fund, which sends money to Texas' public schools. "Because of the huge amount of public money that's involved, it's especially important that members of the State Board of Education who are managing that money comply with both the letter and spirit of the Open Meetings Act," Jim Connolly, assistant county attorney, said Friday. The charges stem from a lunch the three had at a deli in August 2000 with three financial advisers. The advisers - Joe Alderete, Russell Stein and Brian Borowski - also were indicted. All six are charged with conspiring to circumvent the Texas Open Meetings Act and holding a closed meeting. The misdemeanor is punishable by a fine of up to $500 and six months in jail. Bradley said he is confident he will be cleared of wrongdoing. "I am disappointed that after cooperating and waiting for the county attorney that he is now, two years later, pursuing a false misdemeanor charge," Bradley said. Telephone calls to the other board members, the advisers and Board Chairwoman Grace Shore were not immediately returned. Bradley said last week he believed the investigation led by Democrat Travis County Attorney Ken Oden's office was politically motivated. Bradley is running against Democrat Richard Hargrove and Libertarian William McNicoll in the general election for the District 7 seat on the board. Bernal is unopposed this year. Offutt lost in the 2000 primary. At the time of the lunch, the three board members were on the board's finance committee and would have constituted a quorum of the committee. Bradley's attorney, Rusty Hardin, told the Austin American-Statesman that the men ate at Katz's Deli and Bar that day but said it was not an illegal meeting. "How can you have a closed meeting in a public restaurant, where other members of the public are present?" Hardin said. "They were not conducting official business at that meeting, or that lunch." Three Texas Education Agency employees saw one board member dining with a financial adviser, and the other two members dining with other advisers at a nearby table, according to a report by the House General Investigating Committee, a bipartisan group of lawmakers that is still looking into the issue. The employees said they saw documents on both tables pertaining to the hiring of money managers and reported seeing members reviewing reports. Later that day, the full finance committee screened applicants for consultant positions to invest a portion of the school fund. The full 15-member board ultimately awarded contracts to manage $3 billion in taxpayer money based in part on the committee's recommendations. The education board, particularly its handling of the school fund, has been under the microscope for several years. Oden's investigation into the matter started in fall 2000. In separate reports, the state auditor and the House committee accused the education board of a lack of financial expertise. Some members were accused of having adversarial relationships with TEA staff and conflicts of interest with money managers. The grand jury will continue to hear testimony regarding allegations of conflicts of interest and improper use of influence regarding investment decisions about the fund. Peggy Venable, director of the conservative Texas Citizens for a Sound Economy, believes opponents of the board are trying to distract attention from the members' protection of the school fund during a state budget crunch. "These efforts are being engineered by several legislators who have been eyeing the $17 billion fund as a potential revenue source to pay for their overspending," Venable said. Rep. Terry Keel, the Austin Republican who co-chairs the House investigating committee, said, "That statement that there's some theme by lawmakers to steal the money is just a simple falsehood." The committee wants to protect the fund by correcting management problems and has no interest in Thursday's indictments, Keel said.

08/30/2002
A Thank You to Bob Bateman For Schools Service
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A Thank You to Bob Bateman For Schools Service

On Aug. 15, we had the pleasure of attending a dinner given by CSE, Citizens for a Sound Economy, in honor of Bob Bateman and his 20 years as an Orange County School Board member. As we sat, surrounded by family, friends and supporters, we each thought back to 20 years ago when we all began this journey as a family. Over those years we put up signs, handed out cards and, on election days, stood on our feet and thanked voters for their support from dawn to dusk. We celebrated victories and shared disappointments. We've watched him work diligently on other people's campaigns, only to have them turn on him when his support was no longer needed. We've read letters opposing his views and, in recent years, had to watch as a small group of people tried to ruin his name and reputation. But more importantly, we watched him give over 20 years of his life to something he believed in wholeheartedly. No matter how bad things got, he never gave up. He never forgot the commitment he made to the people, and the children, of Orange County. So, as this chapter in our lives comes to a close, we, Bob's children, would like to take the opportunity to say thank you. Thanks to all the people who worked so hard to organize the tribute to our father. Thanks to the voters for giving him the opportunity to make a difference. We'd like to thank those who, through the years, not only supported our father, but supported us with your kind words and encouragement. We'd like to thank our mother, who never chose to be in politics, but has endured it all, just the same. Most importantly, we want to thank our father for being exactly who he is. We learned the importance of hard work, honesty, integrity, loyalty and love, all by example. Life is a dance. Thank you for teaching us the steps. We love you. Mark, Kim and Lori Hillsborough

08/29/2002
Forestry Reform is a Burning Issue
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Press Release

Forestry Reform is a Burning Issue

Although many may remember the summer of 2002 for the spate of corporate scandals and bankruptcies, federal mismanagement also has been responsible for a tragedy on at least as grand a scale. Misguided policies, financial mismanagement, and a bloated bureaucracy resulted in fires destroying almost 6 million acres of forests across the nation. Without significant reforms, next year’s fire season may be just as dangerous. In fact, 190 million acres of public lands are at risk unless federal forestry policies are changed.

08/28/2002
Mailbag: Reader Comments from August 21, 2002
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Press Release

Mailbag: Reader Comments from August 21, 2002

Related Story: The President Leads

08/28/2002
Numbers to Make Your Head Spin
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Press Release

Numbers to Make Your Head Spin

In “The Road Not Taken” poet Robert Frost ponders at a fork in the road and whether or not to choose ’the one less traveled.’ It has always been assumed that this ‘less traveled’ road was the choice for innovators and leaders - for who else would have the temerity to take the road less traveled with all of its pitfalls and potential dangers? Congress now finds itself at a fork in the road. Will they take the more traveled road of more spending and bigger government? Or will they take the less traveled road of fiscal discipline?

08/28/2002
Limited Government on the Anniversary of September 11
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Press Release

Limited Government on the Anniversary of September 11

As the anniversary of September 11 approaches, conservatives will again be presented with the opportunity to explain how their view of the proper role of government squares with the harrowing realities made evident by the heinous terrorist attack. For those who do not understand conservatism, or wish to mischaracterize it for political gain, September 11 was supposed to be a death knell for the ideology: A harsh, yet unmistakable reminder of the primacy of the state in the life of its citizens.

08/28/2002
Strength in Numbers
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Press Release

Strength in Numbers

America heads into the Labor Day weekend with great uncertainty. A war with Iraq may be on the horizon. The economy could be on the road to recovery, or slipping back into recession. The most recent data shows consumer confidence is dropping, but consumer spending on durable goods surging. The country’s mood is undecided with the people almost evenly split on the question of “is the country headed in the right direction or wrong direction?” A baseball strike looms. And, we don’t even know if Steve Spurrier’s offense will work in the NFL.

08/28/2002
CSE Property Rights Activists to Participate in "Sawgrass Rebellion"
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Press Release

CSE Property Rights Activists to Participate in "Sawgrass Rebellion"

A CSE core principle: "Environmental laws must respect the rights of property owners." For years, this principle has been violated by radical environmental groups. The Sierra Club, the Wilderness Society, the Nature Conservancy and others have relentlessly filed lawsuits, misusing the Endangered Species Act to restrict property use and confiscate private property without compensation..

08/27/2002
Various Groups Say Publishers Willing to Alter Textbooks
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Various Groups Say Publishers Willing to Alter Textbooks

BY Jim Suydam

As the State Board of Education ground through the second of three public hearings on proposed history and social studies texts, it became clear Friday that the dozens of publishers at the hearing were listening. Of the more than 500 points of contention brought forward by one pro-business interest group, nearly 40 percent already had been addressed by publishers, said Chris Patterson, director of education research at the Texas Public Policy Foundation. The group, which paid more than $100,000 for an academic review of the texts, has posted scores of the publisher's changes in response to their criticism on their Web site. Others, from private citizens representing no one but themselves to organizations representing tens of thousands, such as the pro-free market Citizens for a Sound Economy, also reported dealing with publishers willing to alter their books to correct errors and avoid criticism. Although some board members pointed to the changing drafts of history as proof that the state's textbook adoption process improves the quality of the final text, others, such as Mary Helen Berlanga, D-Corpus Christi, worried that the board members' grip on the content of Texas textbooks was slipping. "You are not elected, you are not appointed, you're simply people making recommendations to our board," Berlanga said, warning publishers to not be so quick to make the changes requested by anyone other than the board. Board member Alma Allen, D-Houston, agreed: "I don't want the publishers running out and making changes every time your group comes up here to speak." The publishers have the right to do what they want, board chairwoman Grace Shore, R-Longview, said. The State Board of Education only gets to vote on the final texts. "The publishers are free to meet with anyone they want and make any editorial changes they want," Shore said. Austin lawyer Joe Bill Watkins, who represents the American Association of Publishers, said publishers have always been willing to work with anyone interested in developing textbooks. But the increased interest and organization of groups, such as Citizens for a Sound Economy and the Texas Public Policy Foundation, have required more work by publishers. "To some extent, this is what they are used to dealing with every adoption," Watkins said. "There is just more of it in this adoption, in part because it's social studies and there's just more issues." The board's decision to add an additional public hearing, scheduled for Sept. 11, has also brought out more people wanting to make a comment. In November, the board will vote on more than 150 proposed social studies and history texts, selecting which ones make the list of books from which Texas school districts may buy. Making that list means a lot to publishers. Texas will buy 4,681,500 history and social studies books and will spend about $344.7 million on the books and other materials up for review. By the time a publisher takes a book before the board, about 80 percent of the company's investment has been made. Because Texas is the nation's second-largest textbook consumer, it can dictate what other states get as publisher's target their offerings for Texas.

08/24/2002

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