Contact FreedomWorks

400 North Capitol Street, NW
Suite 765
Washington, DC 20001

  • Toll Free 1.888.564.6273
  • Local 202.783.3870

Ditch Mitch As Majority Leader - October 2017

Ditch Mitch As Majority Leader - October 2017

DITCH MITCH
AS SENATE MAJORITY LEADER

All the Latest

    Everything
  • Blog
  • Events
  • Press
  • Key Votes
  • Podcasts
  • Videos
  • Tweets
  • Photos

In Action

Backgrounder: Judicial Crisis on the Sixth Circuit
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Backgrounder: Judicial Crisis on the Sixth Circuit

United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit • The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit, which has 16 authorized seats, has 4 vacancies. President Bush has nominated 4 well-qualified individuals from Michigan to fill these vacancies. All 4 of these vacancies have been deemed judicial emergencies by the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. • The vacancy rate in the Sixth Circuit is 25%. The confirmation of two judges in late April/early May of this year did fill two of six vacancies, but the Circuit remains overburdened.

07/08/2003
Pass H.R. 2556 to Create School Choice for D.C. Students
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Pass H.R. 2556 to Create School Choice for D.C. Students

July 8, 2003 Tom Davis Chairman Committee on Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives 2157 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Dear Chairman Davis: On behalf of the 280,000 members of Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE), I would like to thank you and the other Members of the House Committee on Government Reform for considering H.R. 2556, the District of Columbia Parental Choice Incentive Act of 2003.

07/08/2003
Who is John Kerry?
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Who is John Kerry?

Biography A war hero who served in combat in Vietnam, Senator John Kerry’s formal political career began in 1971 when he helped organize the Vietnam Veterans Against the War. A Yale graduate from a prominent family, he did not fit the profile of a typical combat veteran. He gained national recognition when, in Congressional testimony he asked, “How do you ask a man to be the last to die for a mistake?” Trying to capitalize on this momentum, he ran for Congress in 1972 and lost. Instead of Congress, Kerry went to law school.

07/08/2003
Wake Commissioners Approve $450 Million School Bond Referendum
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Wake Commissioners Approve $450 Million School Bond Referendum

BY Stephanie Hawco and Kamal Wallace

RALEIGH, N.C. -- A decision about a $450 million school bond referendum will be up to the voters. Wake County commissioners agreed Monday to put the school bond package on the October ballot. The school system will use the money to build 13 new schools and make repairs at dozens of campuses. Some people agree that the money is necessary to help Wake County students. "It is unbelievable how many kids attend our schools, so yes, I think there is no way around it really," Wake County resident Tom Mozingo said.

07/07/2003
Lawyers see dollar signs in food attack
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Lawyers see dollar signs in food attack

Big Food may be in big trouble. That is if you listen to lawsuit-happy attorneys who went after "Big Tobacco" and now see big money in hauling fast-food restaurants ‘ aka "Big Food" ‘ into court as culprits in the fattening of America. Lawyers who were instrumental in orchestrating the anti-tobacco lawsuits reportedly met in Boston recently to discuss strategies for suing the fast-food industry, apparently blind to the principle of personal responsibility or the costs that consumers and the economy bear from businesses that are faced with frivolous litigation.

07/07/2003
'Grass-roots' tax foe
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

'Grass-roots' tax foe

BY Eric Fleischauer

While complaining that a state tax-increase proposal is a blatant effort by special interests, a Washington, D.C.-based group refuses to disclose the identity of its own corporate contributors. Citizens for a Sound Economy Inc. and its affiliates historically receive millions from companies that benefit from the "grass-roots" political efforts. The group's latest aim is to defeat a tax-reform package that Gov. Bob Riley proposed.

07/07/2003
CSE NH Thanks Gov. Benson for Budget Veto
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

CSE NH Thanks Gov. Benson for Budget Veto

NH CSE Merrimack County Chairman Alex Klingerman thanks Governor Benson for holding the line on spending and presents him a "I AM CSE" t-shirt at the July 5th Coalition of NH Taxpayers' Picnic.

07/07/2003
Privacy Interests Debate Credit-Reporting Law
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Privacy Interests Debate Credit-Reporting Law

BY Drew Clark

Congress should not permit a law governing credit reporting to expire at the end of the year because of the law's strong consumer benefits, three federal and state financial-services regulators told a congressional panel on Wednesday. But those regulators -- from the Federal Reserve Bank, National Association of Insurance Commissioners and Conference of State Bank Supervisors -- were challenged by Julie Brill, assistant attorney general of Vermont, who said Congress should let the law lapse. Brill, who is co-chairwoman of the privacy working group of the National Association of Attorneys General, said the current credit-granting system is not uniform and that states like Vermont with stricter pre-existing laws have not suffered because of them. Brill found a receptive ear among Democrats on the House Financial Services Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit Subcommittee in the second of a series of hearings on the Fair Credit Reporting Act. "Sometimes this discussion sounds a little Orwellian to me," said Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit Subcommittee ranking member Bernard Sanders, I-Vt. "The people who say they trust the states to do the best job" change their mind when businesses say federal pre-emption of tougher state laws is necessary. When subcommittee Chairman Spencer Bachus, R-Ala., questioned Brill's stance in light of Federal Reserve Chairman Greenspan's support for the extension, Sanders interjected, "In Vermont, some of us do, occasionally, dispute Chairman Greenspan." The industry and broader business communities are mounting a major lobbying push this year to extend the FCRA pre-emption Congress enacted in 1996. Business groups worry that failure to reauthorize the extensions would lop a full percentage point off the gross domestic product and limit consumers' ability to get quick loan decisions. But privacy and consumer advocates say that states need to fight for stricter privacy laws and that the 1996 act may have spurred an increase in identity theft. Howard Beales, director of the FTC's Consumer Protection Bureau, said on Wednesday that the agency's five commissioners have no official position. But a solid majority of those who testified on Wednesday urged extending the pre-emption. They represented groups such as the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Allstate, the National Multi-Housing Counsel, Citizens for a Sound Economy and the major credit-bureau companies. Opponents included the U.S. Public Research Interest Group and National Fair Housing Alliance, and a trial attorney with the National Association of Consumer Advocates. Congress should not permit a law governing credit reporting to expire at the end of the year because of the law's strong consumer benefits, three federal and state financial-services regulators told a congressional panel on Wednesday. But those regulators -- from the Federal Reserve Bank, National Association of Insurance Commissioners and Conference of State Bank Supervisors -- were challenged by Julie Brill, assistant attorney general of Vermont, who said Congress should let the law lapse. Brill, who is co-chairwoman of the privacy working group of the National Association of Attorneys General, said the current credit-granting system is not uniform and that states like Vermont with stricter pre-existing laws have not suffered because of them. Brill found a receptive ear among Democrats on the House Financial Services Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit Subcommittee in the second of a series of hearings on the Fair Credit Reporting Act. "Sometimes this discussion sounds a little Orwellian to me," said Financial Institutions and Consumer Credit Subcommittee ranking member Bernard Sanders, I-Vt. "The people who say they trust the states to do the best job" change their mind when businesses say federal pre-emption of tougher state laws is necessary. When subcommittee Chairman Spencer Bachus, R-Ala., questioned Brill's stance in light of Federal Reserve Chairman Greenspan's support for the extension, Sanders interjected, "In Vermont, some of us do, occasionally, dispute Chairman Greenspan." The industry and broader business communities are mounting a major lobbying push this year to extend the FCRA pre-emption Congress enacted in 1996. Business groups worry that failure to reauthorize the extensions would lop a full percentage point off the gross domestic product and limit consumers' ability to get quick loan decisions. But privacy and consumer advocates say that states need to fight for stricter privacy laws and that the 1996 act may have spurred an increase in identity theft. Howard Beales, director of the FTC's Consumer Protection Bureau, said on Wednesday that the agency's five commissioners have no official position. But a solid majority of those who testified on Wednesday urged extending the pre-emption. They represented groups such as the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Allstate, the National Multi-Housing Counsel, Citizens for a Sound Economy and the major credit-bureau companies. Opponents included the U.S. Public Research Interest Group and National Fair Housing Alliance, and a trial attorney with the National Association of Consumer Advocates.

07/05/2003
Technology's Coming of Age: Part II
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Technology's Coming of Age: Part II

The last column discussed the technology industry on the cusp of a new defining period of growth. As an industry matures, the “reward” is often to become a target for regulation: with the internet, when an industry becomes so pervasive to touch upon almost every area of the economy, it becomes subject to laws that address the old and are interpreted to the new. Laws regulating horse and buggy transportation could cause quite a traffic jam if applied to modern driving. Without a good navigation system, technology companies may find their fate as much determined by Washington as their own good fortune in this new age.

07/04/2003
The power behind the tax cuts
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

The power behind the tax cuts

BY Fred Gaboury

In a brief period of two years, the right wing ideologues who control the federal government have been able to ram trillion-dollar tax cuts through Congress in 2001 and again in 2003, reduced a budget surplus to a deficit, and increase military spending while cutting spending for social programs. By their standards, quite an accomplishment. And the question becomes: How were they able to get away with it?

07/03/2003

Pages