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Money-Bomb - Dec 2015

Money-Bomb - Dec 2015

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In Action

They’re Back
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Press Release

They’re Back

It’s no secret that trial lawyer influence is everywhere, even among the Judicial Inquiry Commission (JIC), the “watchdog” entity supposedly monitoring Alabama judge’s compliance with the Judicial Canons of Ethics. The disciplinary action taken against Supreme Court Justice Harold See by this “watchdog”, as they say, won’t hunt. Although quick to zealously prosecute Justice See over a 7-second statement in an ad run in his 2000 primary campaign for Chief Justice, JIC never bought charges when Ken Ingram, Justice See’s 1996 opponent, broadcast a 30-second ad comparing See to a stinking skunk.

02/20/2002
Bush Clears the Air
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Press Release

Bush Clears the Air

Last week, President Bush offered his most comprehensive policy proposal on the threat of global warming since his decision to scrap the unworkable Kyoto Protocol last year. The plan would create a registry for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions and then reward firms for voluntary reductions. The decision was not well received by leftist environmental groups, or global warming skeptics, which should please the administration, as it was looking for a “third way” on the issue.

02/20/2002
End the Public School Monopoly: America Needs Competition in Education
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Press Release

End the Public School Monopoly: America Needs Competition in Education

This week, as we celebrate President’s Day, all across the country school kids are learning the history of great American leaders like George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. Unfortunately, while we celebrate our common history, not all American kids have access to the same quality education.

02/20/2002
A Proposed Legal, Regulatory, and Operational Structure for an Investment-Based Social Security System
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Press Release

A Proposed Legal, Regulatory, and Operational Structure for an Investment-Based Social Security System

As Social Security's problems become more apparent, support for the concept of privatizing the retirement program grows. As the debate develops, it becomes increasingly important to move beyond generalizations and to provide detailed proposals for how such privatization could be accomplished. Without endorsing any specific proposal, the Cato Project on Social Security Privatization will, from time to time, present a number of possible privatization scenarios.

02/19/2002
Real Campaign Finance Reform: Smaller Government
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Press Release

Real Campaign Finance Reform: Smaller Government

Last week, the U.S. House of Representatives passed bipartisan legislation designed to resolve the thorny issue of money in politics. The campaign finance reform legislation, sponsored by Chris Shays (R-Conn.) and Marty Meehan (D-Mass.) offers new regulations on the flow of money in the political system. The bill is similar to a measure passed by the Senate last year; unless opponents in the Senate can successfully filibuster the bill, it will be heading to the president’s desk, where Bush must decide whether to veto the legislation. While the bill appears to be on the fast track to passage, its ability to reform campaign finance is questionable. In addition to raising legitimate First Amendment concerns, the bill does nothing to address fundamental source of the problem: an expanding government presence in the economy. For real reform, a smaller, less-intrusive government would reduce the need for businesses, unions, and other special interests to seek favor with the government.

02/19/2002
Internal Probe Clears Top Andersen Execs Of Shredding Enron Documents
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Internal Probe Clears Top Andersen Execs Of Shredding Enron Documents

The Bulletin's Frontrunner

02/19/2002
Market Solutions to Bad Genes and Organ Needs
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Market Solutions to Bad Genes and Organ Needs

BY Richard Morin and Claudia Deane

Here's a novel thought: Why not sell gene insurance to protect people financially when a genetic test reveals a nasty surprise that boosts their health insurance rates? Here's another: Why not fine judges who parole criminals who then go out and commit more crimes? And one more: Why not restrict organ transplants only to people who previously agreed to be organ donors? Didn't get around to signing an organ donor card? Aw, too bad -- No kidney for you.

02/19/2002
Internal Probe Clears Top Andersen Execs Of Shredding Enron Documents.
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Internal Probe Clears Top Andersen Execs Of Shredding Enron Documents.

Newsweek (2/25, Sloan, Hosenball) reports, "Arthur Andersen, Enron's outside accountants, may soon be back in the news, with top executives at headquarters in Chicago trying to offload blame for document-shredding onto the Houston office, where Enron's audits were carried out. Newsweek has learned that Andersen's internal investigation has provisionally cleared the firm's top managers of responsibility for the document-shredding disclosed a month ago. The shredding began after a lawyer in the head office sent her Houston colleagues a copy of Andersen's document-retention policy. But Andersen's investigators have tentatively concluded that the shredding had nothing to do with the letter. Rather, investigators believe, the shredding resulted from collusion between Enron employees and members of Andersen's Houston office. It's not clear what evidence -- if any -- backs up that allegation. It's a sign of the times that Andersen is so jumpy, it has hired two other law firms that are monitoring the investigation. Asked for comment, an Andersen spokesman would say only that the internal investigation is continuing and that 'no conclusions have been reached. '"

02/19/2002
Panel votes to change judges' rules
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Panel votes to change judges' rules

MONTGOMERY, Ala. -- Alabama legislators are getting involved in the disciplinary process for judges while a complaint is pending against state Supreme Court Justice Harold See. The Senate Judiciary Committee voted 8-7 Thursday for two bills changing the rules for the state Judicial Inquiry Commission, which acts like a grand jury to hear complaints against judges, and the state Court of the Judiciary, which disciplines judges for improper conduct. The two bills now go to the Senate for consideration.

02/17/2002
Attention turning to Global Crossing
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Attention turning to Global Crossing

BY Jube Shiver Jr. and Karen Kaplan

Interest is building on Capitol Hill for an investigation of the business and accounting practices that steered telecommunications pioneer Global Crossing Ltd. into bankruptcy court, stranding workers and investors with worthless stock while company executives reaped huge financial rewards.

02/17/2002

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