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Florida CSE Grassroots Activists Storm the State House Demand School Choice -- and Win
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Press Release

Florida CSE Grassroots Activists Storm the State House Demand School Choice -- and Win

Today 250 Florida Citizens for a Sound Economy grassroots activists in CSE t-shirts that read "School Choice: giving parents a voice" and "School Choice Now" buttons lobbied their state representatives to demand support for H.B. 303 and S.B. 504. This legislation will allow parents of students in schools at over 120 percent capacity to take part of the state tax dollars spent on their child’s and use it at another public or private school. The bill passed in the House today.

03/22/2001
Foes Of Tax Cuts, Fans Of Big Gov't
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Foes Of Tax Cuts, Fans Of Big Gov't

BY James C. Miller III

Amid the controversy over House action on President Bush's tax cut, it's easy to miss the bigger battle. Whether Bush is moving too fast or too slowly, whether government should address revenue before outlays or vice versa, whether there should be a "trigger" on the tax cut - these are all tactics in the larger battle over the size and scope of the federal government. Take the argument that the president has "rushed through" the tax cut. Any new administration can get more done in the first day than in the next week, and more in that week than in the next month. Also, it is easier to defeat a bill than to get one passed into law. So fail to act quickly, and your tax cut is toast. Not surprisingly, those making the charge that the House acted precipitously and ignored "democratic processes" are found on the side of bigger government. Or take the debate over deciding revenue before outlays. Should Congress first decide how much of the taxpayers' money it can "afford" to spend and then budget accordingly? Or should it decide how much to spend and then adjust tax revenue? The second approach leads to greater revenue and spending than the first. So is it any wonder that those whose vision is an ever-larger government are among the most vocal critics of addressing revenue first? Finally, take the proposal to incorporate a "trigger" that would suspend the tax cut if the surplus fell below forecast. Such triggers do work. In the 1980s we had one called Gramm-Rudman-Hollings (GRH). In the first year of its operation, the growth in the federal deficit was reversed and came down a record $ 71 billion. Government spending, adjusted for inflation, actually fell for the first time in nearly two decades. In fact, GRH worked so well that it came under intense fire from members of Congress who simply could not live within its restraints. The GRH trigger was on the spending side. If the deficit failed to be eliminated according to schedule, a "mechanical robot" would cut spending across the board. Under the trigger being promoted today, if the surplus weren't maintained, tax rates would go up. But if the concern is really about the surplus, a spending trigger would suffice just as well. In fact, a spending trigger would work better. The tax cut is designed to put the economy back on its expansionary course by lowering marginal tax rates and giving investors more incentives to expand production. A tax trigger would add uncertainty and dampen the response the tax cut is meant to create. Naturally, proponents of the tax trigger tend to be aligned with larger government. What is surprising is that the proponents of the tax cut don't counter with a trigger of their own - one that would cut spending and thus focus the debate on the real issue, the size and scope of government. James Miller is a former director of the Office of Management and Budget. He is currently counselor to Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation, a market-based education organization in Washington, D.C.

03/22/2001
Capitol Comment 293 - Education not Litigation: The Paul D. Coverdell Teacher Liability Protection Act of 2001
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 293 - Education not Litigation: The Paul D. Coverdell Teacher Liability Protection Act of 2001

While schoolchildren often worry about fitting in with their peers, teachers are becoming more and more concerned each school year with the threat of lawsuits. In fact, a survey by the American Federation of Teachers shows that liability protection ranks among the top three concerns teachers want their unions to address. Thankfully, a bill in the U.S. Senate, “The Paul D. Coverdell Teacher Liability Protection Act” (S. 316), will help ease teachers’ concerns and allow them to focus on educating our children, rather than the threat of litigation.

03/21/2001
Capitol Comment 292 - Evidence Shows School Choice Works
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 292 - Evidence Shows School Choice Works

Schools ought to be more accountable for students’ educational achievement. To that end, President Bush’s education plan proposes to make accountability enforceable: If a school fails to make progress in educating disadvantaged students for three years, parents of these students could use federal Title I funds to move their children to an alternative public or private school.

03/21/2001
Florida CSE Activists Storm the State House to Demand School Choice
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Press Release

Florida CSE Activists Storm the State House to Demand School Choice

Nearly 250 of Florida Citizens for a Sound Economy’s activists lobbied their state representatives to demand support for H.B. 303 and S.B. 504. This legislation applies to parents of students attending schools at over 120 percent capacity. Parents would be allowed to take part of the tax dollars spent on their child and use it at another public or private school. Activists also urged support for separate legislation to allow a tax credit for businesses that contribute to private scholarships, thereby making school choice available to even more parents.

03/21/2001
Florida CSE Day Brings Over 250 CSE Activists to the Capitol to Lobby Against Prescription Drug Price-Caps and other Core CSE Is
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Press Release

Florida CSE Day Brings Over 250 CSE Activists to the Capitol to Lobby Against Prescription Drug Price-Caps and other Core CSE Is

Tallahassee, FL - Once again, Florida Citizens for a Sound Economy (FL CSE) hosted its annual FL CSE Day at the Capitol, bringing in over 250 CSE activists from across Florida to met with their legislators and discuss important issues and legislation. The two-day event was filled with guest speakers such as Secretary of State Katherine Harris, press conferences with guest speaker Tom Feeney, Speaker of the House, lobby visits, and activist training seminars. Activists also had the opportunity to watch the House of Representatives debate legislation.

03/21/2001
Tech Bytes- Tid Bits in Tech News: The Spectre of Antitrust
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Press Release

Tech Bytes- Tid Bits in Tech News: The Spectre of Antitrust

Oral arguments before the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals concerning the Microsoft antitrust case revealed significant holes in the government’s case. The judges’ overt skepticism of the government’s attempted monopolization and tying cases suggests that the break-up order is dead and that the case may be dropped altogether.

03/21/2001
Grassroots Activists and Oregon CSE Director to testify on Bush Tax Cut Resolution
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Press Release

Grassroots Activists and Oregon CSE Director to testify on Bush Tax Cut Resolution

Today, grassroots activists and Russ Walker, Director of Oregon Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE), will testify before the House Rules, Redistricting and Public Affairs Committee. They will speak in support of H.J.M. 28. The legislation calls on Oregon’s Congressional delegation to vote in favor of the Bush tax cut package. Representatives Patridge and Starr filed the bill on behalf of Oregon CSE and taxpayers.

03/21/2001
First Toilets, Now Washing Machines
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First Toilets, Now Washing Machines

BY Thomas Bray

Several years ago, hosting a town meeting back in his Oakland County congressional district, Rep. Joe Knollenberg was prepared to talk about everything from the federal budget to foreign policy. Instead, he found himself being peppered with complaints from irate homeowners protesting a 1992 law requiring the substitution of so-called low-flow toilets for the old 3.5-gallon tanks.

03/21/2001
Issue Analysis 117 - Economic Deregulation and Re-regulation: Benefits and Threats
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Press Release

Issue Analysis 117 - Economic Deregulation and Re-regulation: Benefits and Threats

Economic deregulation in the airline, railroad, and telecommunications industries has generated tremendous benefits for consumers. In all three industries, deregulation has led to price reductions of at least 20 percent, and likely much more. Service quality has also improved dramatically compared to what the quality of service would have been under continue deregulation.

03/20/2001

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