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Capitol Comment 226 - NASA Scientist Declares Climate Prediction Impossible: Is it Time for a New Climate Change Policy?
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 226 - NASA Scientist Declares Climate Prediction Impossible: Is it Time for a New Climate Change Policy?

Dr. James Hansen — the same scientist who alarmed Americans in 1988 with claims that global warming would bring catastrophic temperature increases — has declared before the scientific community in a prestigious journal of the National Academy of Sciences that predicting global temperature with climate models is all but impossible.1 Hansen’s pronouncement shakes the foundation of the climate policy debate, because without reliable climate model projections and almost no evidence of a warming trend, there is little reason to anticipate catastrophic global warming.

03/03/1999
Capitol Comment 226 - NASA Scientist Declares Climate Prediction Impossible: Is it Time for a New Climate Change Policy?
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 226 - NASA Scientist Declares Climate Prediction Impossible: Is it Time for a New Climate Change Policy?

Dr. James Hansen — the same scientist who alarmed Americans in 1988 with claims that global warming would bring catastrophic temperature increases — has declared before the scientific community in a prestigious journal of the National Academy of Sciences that predicting global temperature with climate models is all but impossible.1 Hansen’s pronouncement shakes the foundation of the climate policy debate, because without reliable climate model projections and almost no evidence of a warming trend, there is little reason to anticipate catastrophic global warming.

03/03/1999
Giving Parents a Voice: Why School Choice is Good for Kids
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Press Release

Giving Parents a Voice: Why School Choice is Good for Kids

Americans are free to make decisions about their health, education, and welfare. We can choose what to eat, how to exercise, whom to marry, where to worship, and which candidate deserves our vote. Students can use federal financial aid to attend the college of their choice – even a seminary! But most Americans have little ability to choose how or where their children will be educated during their most critical formative years.

03/01/1999
HUD’s Insurance Obsession
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Press Release

HUD’s Insurance Obsession

It is arguable that America never needed a federal "Department of Housing and Urban Development," notwithstanding Congress’s decision to create one in the 1960s. But whatever the rationale for HUD’s existence thirty years ago, the agency’s conduct during the Clinton Administration demonstrates the need for more vigorous oversight by the 106th Congress.

02/26/1999
Playing Parlor Games: What Justice Ought Not Do
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Press Release

Playing Parlor Games: What Justice Ought Not Do

The latest parlor game around the nation’s capital involves predicting the punishment for activity that is allegedly inappropriate and illegal. Of course, I am writing about the antitrust case brought by the Department of Justice against Microsoft. The government claims that Microsoft is using its operating system as leverage to corner the market on Internet browsers. If Microsoft were found guilty, the case would move to a penalty phase. At that point, regulators will be hard pressed to implement a remedy that would not harm consumers.

02/26/1999
Issue Analysis 86 - Suppressing Generic Drugs Fleeces Consumers
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Issue Analysis

Issue Analysis 86 - Suppressing Generic Drugs Fleeces Consumers

Brand name pharmaceutical companies and federal and state governments are raiding consumers’ pocketbooks by preventing them from buying generic drugs. Such restrictions can be an enormous financial drain, especially for low-income Americans and seniors who live on fixed incomes and pay for prescriptions out-of-pocket.

02/25/1999
Issue Analysis 85 - A Primer on Price Cap Regulation
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Press Release

Issue Analysis 85 - A Primer on Price Cap Regulation

Oregon legislators are considering a proposal that would modernize the regulation of the telecommunications marketplace. This would be achieved by redirecting the focus of regulators from companies toward consumers.

02/25/1999
Consumer Group Advises Congress Not to Ignore DOJ's Attempts to Stifle Innovation and Competition
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Press Release

Consumer Group Advises Congress Not to Ignore DOJ's Attempts to Stifle Innovation and Competition

In a letter delivered to Congress today, Paul Beckner, President of Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) Foundation, called attention to recent activities that refute the Department of Justice's (DOJ) antitrust claims, as well as the DOJ's attempts to stifle innovation and competition through their pursuits against Microsoft Corporation. The text of the letter follows:

02/25/1999
Capitol Comment 225 - Rails and Wires: What’s the Difference?
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 225 - Rails and Wires: What’s the Difference?

As Congress takes up reauthorization of the Surface Transportation Board, lawmakers will surely hear from rail shippers who want expanded "competitive access" for railroads. The basic idea is to treat railroad tracks the same way the 1996 Telecommunications Act treats local telephone wires – as facilities open for use by all competitors at a regulated rate. Under this concept, a shipper served by only one railroad could expand its options by forcing that railroad to let competing railroads use its track.

02/22/1999
Capitol Comment 222 - The Real Cost of the Kyoto Protocol
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 222 - The Real Cost of the Kyoto Protocol

Estimating the cost of the Kyoto Protocol, the international global warming treaty, has produced disagreement among the government’s energy analysts. President Clinton’s Council of Economic Advisors (CEA) put the cost of the treaty at $12 billion annually.1 Energy experts at the Energy Information Administration (EIA) put the yearly impact as high as $397 billion.2 Who’s right? Judging by the continued failure of international negotiators to create alleged cost-saving implementation measures, such as global emissions trading, the dire projections by EIA may be all too real.

02/10/1999

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