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Capitol Comment 198 - Would We Tax Freedom?
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 198 - Would We Tax Freedom?

Last month, Lady Margaret spoke and the House moved. The remarks of Great Britain’s former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher to the World Congress on Information Technology reinforced the idea that information is an essential component of freedom. As such, it should not be heavily taxed.

07/24/1998
Capitol Comment 197 - Al Gore’s Hidden Phone Tax: Bad Economics, Bad Politics
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 197 - Al Gore’s Hidden Phone Tax: Bad Economics, Bad Politics

If you haven’t heard of the "Gore tax," you’re probably missing an important battle over the nature of American democracy and the American economy. The battle has two fronts and the public is losing on both. On one front, the methodical centralization of power in the hands of unelected bureaucrats moves forward. On the other, the burdening of our economy continues. Here are the details of the current skirmish:

07/24/1998
The Benefits of Social Security
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Press Release

The Benefits of Social Security

The economic case for privatization as a response to Social Security’s insolvency problems has been made extensively in the academic and policy literature. How privatization would affect various social groups, however, has remained largely unaddressed. There are reasons to be especially concerned about the impact of reform on women. Women are known to be disproportionately dependent on Social Security benefits in their old age and because of longer life expectancy and employment patterns, an elderly woman is twice as likely to be living in poverty as is an elderly man.

07/20/1998
Capitol Comment 193 - A Real Patients’ Bill of Rights
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 193 - A Real Patients’ Bill of Rights

America’s health care system is the finest in the world, yet American patients increasingly face higher costs, fewer choices and greater rationing of medical care. A recent news item describes how politicians typically address these problems: Democrats are often more willing to spend money on new or existing government programs and to regulate the insurance market, while Republicans usually prefer to use the tax code as an instrument of social policy.1

06/19/1998
Capitol Comment 192 - Universal Service Reform: Benchmarks for Success
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 192 - Universal Service Reform: Benchmarks for Success

Universal service subsidies keep the price of telecommunications service in hard-to-reach and high-cost areas on par with the price of service to inexpensive areas. Substantial reform for this system of wealth transfers is now politically viable. All universal service reform proposals should begin by facing the following economic reality: Consumers pay for subsidies. With this proposition in mind, the policy benchmarks that follow can be utilized to measure reform proposals.

06/16/1998
Capitol Comment 191 - Competition Through Innovation, Not Regulation
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 191 - Competition Through Innovation, Not Regulation

The Telecommunications Act of 1996 has been an agent of tremendous change. New regulatory burdens, repeating cycles of litigation and few observable benefits to consumers have been its progeny. All of that is about to become history. An agile long-distance company with a ferocious appetite for new customers is prepared to defy Washington regulators.

05/21/1998
Capitol Comment 189 - Implementing Kyoto without Senate Ratification: Clinton-Gore’s ‘Think Globally, Regulate Locally’ Campaign
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 189 - Implementing Kyoto without Senate Ratification: Clinton-Gore’s ‘Think Globally, Regulate Locally’ Campaign

Every high school civics student knows that two-thirds of the U.S. Senate must ratify any treaty before it becomes law. However, the Clinton administration is attempting to bypass the Constitution, encouraging state and local governments to implement the Kyoto Protocol, the recently-negotiated global warming treaty, before submitting it to the Senate.

05/18/1998
Capitol Comment 188 - The Clandestine Cost Analysis of the Kyoto Protocol
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 188 - The Clandestine Cost Analysis of the Kyoto Protocol

After months of waiting, Council of Economic Advisors member Janet Yellen has revealed the administration’s cost estimates of the Kyoto Protocol. She claims that the cost of the agreement to the average American family would be no more than $110 annually.1 This figure, however, remains controversial and differs greatly from the analyses of responsible economic forecasting firms, such as WEFA, Inc., that put the impact to American families at $2,700.2

05/18/1998
Capitol Comment 189 - Implementing Kyoto without Senate Ratification: Clinton-Gore’s ‘Think Globally, Regulate Locally’ Campaign
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 189 - Implementing Kyoto without Senate Ratification: Clinton-Gore’s ‘Think Globally, Regulate Locally’ Campaign

Every high school civics student knows that two-thirds of the U.S. Senate must ratify any treaty before it becomes law. However, the Clinton administration is attempting to bypass the Constitution, encouraging state and local governments to implement the Kyoto Protocol, the recently-negotiated global warming treaty, before submitting it to the Senate.

05/18/1998
Capitol Comment 187 - Smoggy Science: The Truth Behind Ozone Transport
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 187 - Smoggy Science: The Truth Behind Ozone Transport

Urban ozone smog has declined nationwide for over a decade, with particularly strong gains in the Northeast (see chart1). Despite such improvements in air quality, the standard for ozone has been tightened, escalating fears among many states that increasing controls on local sources of ozone smog will fail to achieve compliance.

05/14/1998

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