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FULLY Repeal ObamaCare - April 2017

FULLY Repeal ObamaCare - April 2017

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Capitol Comment 246 - “Saving” Salmon in the Pacific Northwest: The Endangered Species Act Hits Home
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 246 - “Saving” Salmon in the Pacific Northwest: The Endangered Species Act Hits Home

Salmon have long been a symbol of the Pacific Northwest, and an important part of the region’s culture and industry. However, in recent years, salmon have become a heavily regulated symbol as federal, state, and local governments have struggled to address a decline in the population of these fish.

08/12/1999
Issue Analysis 94 - Antitrust and Consumer Welfare
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Press Release

Issue Analysis 94 - Antitrust and Consumer Welfare

During the past decade, the American economy has undergone a massive restructuring that raises new questions about the effects of antitrust policy on consumer welfare. Information Age firms emerge from nowhere to dominate their newly-created markets, and older companies employ mergers to consolidate in shrinking markets or to morph their way into new markets. Federal antitrust officials find themselves criticized for high-profile lawsuits against Microsoft and American Airlines at the same time that they have approved major telecommunications mergers. State attorneys general have embarked on a new wave of antitrust activism, reflecting parochial political considerations as well as concerns that federal enforcement is inadequate.

08/10/1999
Tech Fact #2 - The Sky is NOT Falling, The Sky is NOT Falling - “Lost” Sales Taxes and the Internet
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Press Release

Tech Fact #2 - The Sky is NOT Falling, The Sky is NOT Falling - “Lost” Sales Taxes and the Internet

Many state and local officials believe the sky is about to start falling because retail sales taxes are routinely disregarded in online (Internet) transactions. The National Association of Counties and U.S. Conference of Mayors have even filed a lawsuit to prevent meetings of the Advisory Commission on Electronic Commerce, which was created by Congress to recommend future Internet tax policies. The National Governors’ Association recently stated that by 2002, states will lose $20 billion in revenue from online transactions.

08/03/1999
Spending Your Tax Cut: The A to Z Guide of How Washington is Wasting Your Money Instead of Cutting Your Taxes
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Press Release

Spending Your Tax Cut: The A to Z Guide of How Washington is Wasting Your Money Instead of Cutting Your Taxes

A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Cut the Pork, Don’t Spend Our Tax Cut

08/01/1999
Tax Fact #31: Dairy Cartels Impose a Milk Tax on Consumers
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Press Release

Tax Fact #31: Dairy Cartels Impose a Milk Tax on Consumers

Most Americans would be shocked to know that the price they pay for a gallon of milk is dependent in part upon how far they are from Eau Claire, Wisconsin. It sounds crazy, but it’s true. In addition, under the antiquated dairy compact schemes, holdovers from the Great Depression era, Congress has allowed states to form cartels that prop up prices for the inefficient local dairy industry, costing consumers millions of dollars in higher milk prices, and effectively imposing a "milk tax" in those regions.

07/30/1999
Tech Fact #1 - From 'Remember the Maine' to 'No New Taxes': A History of the Telecommunications Excise Tax
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Press Release

Tech Fact #1 - From 'Remember the Maine' to 'No New Taxes': A History of the Telecommunications Excise Tax

The federal excise tax on telecommunications is an outdated and ineffective levy that harms consumers. First taken off the books in 1902, the telecommunications excise tax continues to resurface. Time and again public officials promise to end the tax on talking. For more than a century, these promises have been broken, forgotten or ignored.

07/29/1999
Tax Fact #30: The Only “Emergency” is the Lack of Political Courage
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Press Release

Tax Fact #30: The Only “Emergency” is the Lack of Political Courage

Lacking the political courage to cut waste, redundancy and obsolete programs from their spending bills, House Appropriators have resorted to indefensible budget gimmicks in order to "comply" with the discretionary spending limits required by the 1997 Balanced Budget Act. In the past week, Appropriators have declared nearly $10 billion in spending for routine programs – such as the 2000 decennial census and veterans health care – as "emergency" spending, which does not have to be offset by cuts elsewhere in the budget (meaning, it is funded with surplus dollars) and does not count against the discretionary spending caps.

07/28/1999
Tax Fact #30: The Only “Emergency” is the Lack of Political Courage
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Press Release

Tax Fact #30: The Only “Emergency” is the Lack of Political Courage

Lacking the political courage to cut waste, redundancy and obsolete programs from their spending bills, House Appropriators have resorted to indefensible budget gimmicks in order to "comply" with the discretionary spending limits required by the 1997 Balanced Budget Act. In the past week, Appropriators have declared nearly $10 billion in spending for routine programs – such as the 2000 decennial census and veterans health care – as "emergency" spending, which does not have to be offset by cuts elsewhere in the budget (meaning, it is funded with surplus dollars) and does not count against the discretionary spending caps.

07/28/1999
Tax Fact #28: Department of Commerce: Financial Mismanagement and Redundancy Should Rule Out Spending Increases
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Press Release

Tax Fact #28: Department of Commerce: Financial Mismanagement and Redundancy Should Rule Out Spending Increases

Before giving money to federal programs, Congress has a moral obligation to ensure that these programs can account for every tax dollar they spend. This week, when the Senate considers increasing the budget for the Department of Commerce by $2.1 billion ($1.7 billion of which is dedicated to the 2000 Census), lawmakers should take note of a recent General Accounting Office report that most agencies within this department "lack the basic financial and performance information they need to manage their programs and activities and improve their performance."

07/21/1999
Capitol Comment 243 - Class Action Lawsuits: America's New Boom Industry
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 243 - Class Action Lawsuits: America's New Boom Industry

The class action lawsuit: a good idea gone bad. A class action lawsuit allows adjudication of the claims of many similarly situated plaintiffs in one trial, as opposed to each individual plaintiff bringing his or her own claim. For instance, if a credit card company wrongly overcharged every cardholder by $1,000, cardholders could join together in a class action, rather than each suing the credit card company individually.

07/20/1999

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