Contact FreedomWorks

400 North Capitol Street, NW
Suite 765
Washington, DC 20001

  • Toll Free 1.888.564.6273
  • Local 202.783.3870
Capitol Comment 264 - The Internet: Do the Candidates Get It?
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 264 - The Internet: Do the Candidates Get It?

The Republican debates have always provided an ample opportunity for voters to learn where candidates stand on tax issues. What is new this year is an emphasis on taxation of the Internet and electronic commerce. It appears the candidates are just beginning to hear the message from voters: We need a new tax code that respects the modern family and encourages the emerging digital economy.

01/14/2000
Taxation and the Cyber-Frontier
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Taxation and the Cyber-Frontier

In late 1999, there are more than 100 million American adults using the Internet, up from 65 million in mid-1998 and 84 million at the end of 1998. According to a University of Texas study, Internet-economy revenues are expected to reach $1.2 trillion by 2002, rivaling health care as the nation's largest industrial sector. Between 25 and 33 percent of America’s economic growth in the 1990s has been due to the information-technology sector.

12/14/1999
Tech Fact #5 - No Net Taxes? Think Again!
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Tech Fact #5 - No Net Taxes? Think Again!

Congress may have enacted a moratorium on new Internet taxes, but many Americans still pay a mighty high toll on their way to the Information Superhighway. A recent Progress & Freedom Foundation (PFF) study reveals that existing telecommunications taxes dramatically raise the cost of reaching the Internet.1 The federal government makes logging-on more expensive through three types of telecommunications taxes:

11/03/1999
E-Rate: Prepared Statement of Kent Lassman before the Committee on the Judiciary, U.S. House of Representatives
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

E-Rate: Prepared Statement of Kent Lassman before the Committee on the Judiciary, U.S. House of Representatives

"It is my … hope and aspiration that all of us … may eventually be gathered together in a heaven of everlasting rest and peace and bliss - except the inventor of the telephone." - Mark Twain, circa 1878 Introduction After more than 120 years, if a single improvement could be made to Twain’s curmudgeonly comment it would be the word "taxation." Let us all gather together … except for the inventor of telephone taxation.

11/03/1999
Tech Fact #4 - Taxing the Internet, Let Me Count the Ways ...
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Tech Fact #4 - Taxing the Internet, Let Me Count the Ways ...

Federal legislation imposed a temporary moratorium on new Internet taxes, but that has not stopped enterprising politicians from proposing numerous ways to tax electronic commerce:

10/21/1999
E-Rate: Prepared Statement of Kent Lassman before the Commerce Committtee's Subcommittee on Telecommunications, Trade, and Consu
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

E-Rate: Prepared Statement of Kent Lassman before the Commerce Committtee's Subcommittee on Telecommunications, Trade, and Consu

Introduction "For every old blackboard there are now hundreds of new electronic computers." So said President Dwight Eisenhower in his televised farewell address on January 17th, 1961. Of course, this speech is more famous for Eisenhower’s warning to "guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex."

09/30/1999
Tech Fact #3 - Consumers to Politicians: No Internet Tax
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Capitol Comment

Tech Fact #3 - Consumers to Politicians: No Internet Tax

As President Clinton vetoes Congress’s tax cut – thereby rejecting American values of hard work, thrift and marriage – other politicians in Congress and the state houses would increase taxes, despite record budget surpluses at the federal and state levels. Why tax the Internet? Well, that’s where the money is these days, right? Politicians see the large numbers associated with E-commerce and get greedy. They claim they are "losing" tremendous amounts of money because sales taxes do not apply to most Internet transactions. However, this claim is based on rhetoric, not facts.1

09/23/1999
Capitol Comment 252 - No Internet Tax: Why Internet Sales Taxes Aren’t Necessary
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 252 - No Internet Tax: Why Internet Sales Taxes Aren’t Necessary

Ten years ago, discount retailers like Wal-Mart were redefining the face of the American retail industry. Today, online retailers like Amazon.com are again redefining not only the ways that businesses interact with their customers, but also how they interact with each other. Two years ago, Congress passed a three-year moratorium on new Internet taxes to help the fledgling market grow. In the interim, the battle to create an Internet tax plan has begun.

09/16/1999
Tech Fact #2 - The Sky is NOT Falling, The Sky is NOT Falling - “Lost” Sales Taxes and the Internet
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Tech Fact #2 - The Sky is NOT Falling, The Sky is NOT Falling - “Lost” Sales Taxes and the Internet

Many state and local officials believe the sky is about to start falling because retail sales taxes are routinely disregarded in online (Internet) transactions. The National Association of Counties and U.S. Conference of Mayors have even filed a lawsuit to prevent meetings of the Advisory Commission on Electronic Commerce, which was created by Congress to recommend future Internet tax policies. The National Governors’ Association recently stated that by 2002, states will lose $20 billion in revenue from online transactions.

08/03/1999
Tech Fact #1 - From 'Remember the Maine' to 'No New Taxes': A History of the Telecommunications Excise Tax
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Tech Fact #1 - From 'Remember the Maine' to 'No New Taxes': A History of the Telecommunications Excise Tax

The federal excise tax on telecommunications is an outdated and ineffective levy that harms consumers. First taken off the books in 1902, the telecommunications excise tax continues to resurface. Time and again public officials promise to end the tax on talking. For more than a century, these promises have been broken, forgotten or ignored.

07/29/1999

Pages