Contact FreedomWorks

400 North Capitol Street, NW
Suite 765
Washington, DC 20001

  • Toll Free 1.888.564.6273
  • Local 202.783.3870
Regional Roundup
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Regional Roundup

Buncombe County New class to be offered in Asheville ASHEVILLE -- The free, 12-week Family-to-Family Education Class, sponsored by the National Association for the Mentally Ill, will be offered in Asheville from 6:30 to 9 p.m. on Thursdays beginning May 1. Designed for families and friends of people with a serious mental illness, the course offers coping skills and up-to-date facts about bipolar disorder/manic depression, schizophrenia, clinical depression, panic disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. A clinical psychologist who holds a doctorate and who has ill family members has written the extensive materials that are provided at no cost. Now offered in 44 states, NAMI Family-to-Family is an educational outreach of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill and is taught by trained family members. Because class size is limited, registration is required. Call 252-6824. Warren Wilson gets Bible study grant SWANNANOA -- Warren Wilson College is among 24 schools related to the Presbyterian Church (USA) that will receive Bible study grants from the Office of Colleges and Universities in the denomination's higher education program area. A total of $207,400 was awarded to the schools in Grants for Teaching of the Bible to support new courses and pay for resources. The grant to Warren Wilson will provide $10,000, the maximum amount awarded to any one school, over three years to assist the development of the college's Bible and social ethics program. WNC Alliance to meet ASHEVILLE -- The Buncombe County Chapter of the Western North Carolina Alliance will meet at 5:30 p.m. today in the First Presbyterian Church on Church Street in Asheville. Those attending will get an update on clean air and wind power, transit initiatives and the recent Earth Day celebration in Asheville. To find out more, contact Norma Ivey at 258-8737. Henderson County Knights of Columbus to present awards HENDERSONVILLE -- The Knights of Columbus will celebrate its annual Shield Awards at 7:30 tonight in the St. Francis Room on the lower level of Immaculate Conception Catholic Church. This award honors members of Henderson County and Hendersonville police department who exemplify professionalism and especially service to the community. Honorees are selected by their individual department heads. The respective departments have selected the honorees, and the Knights of Columbus will present the awards. Henderson County Commissioner Grady Hawkins and Hendersonville Mayor Fred H. Niehoff Jr. will be presented awards and make remarks. Johnson Farm Festival coming up HENDERSONVILLE -- The 13th annual Johnson Farm Festival, a celebration of spring and mountain heritage, will take place Saturday. The festival highlights the historic Henderson County farm, which is on the National Register of Historic Places. Those attending the festival can look forward to music, food and entertainment. Some features of the festival are bluegrass and dulcimer music, farm animals, homemade pound cake and fried apple pies. Twenty-six craftsmen, artists and demonstrators, 12 musical acts, plus school PTOs and festival volunteers donate their services to benefit the farm. The horse-drawn wagon rides will be offered again this year and are included with admission price. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for children age 5 and older; preschoolers are free when accompanied by an adult. Festival hours are from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Macon County Free health screening planned HIGHLANDS -- A free health screening sponsored by Highlands-Cashiers Hospital will be from 7 to 11 a.m. May 17 at the Highlands Conference Center. Participants will be checked for blood pressure, blood sugar levels, cholesterol levels, height, weight, bone density and body composition. Participants must pre-register by visiting www.hchospital.org or by calling 526-1435. Registrations will be accepted until 5 p.m. May 15. Swain County Swain County group to meet BRYSON CITY -- A new chapter of the group Citizens for a Sound Economy will meet in Bryson City at 6:30 p.m. today at the Swain County Administration Building. Organizers say the group "hopes to raise public awareness and gain support for landowners currently involved in disputes with the U.S. Forest Service and other federal land agencies." The guest speaker will be Matt Bennett, co-founder and executive director of Treekeepers.org. To find out more about the group or the meeting, call 488-3096. Transylvania County Artist studio tour coming up BREVARD -- The Transylvania County Arts Council is presenting the Handmade in Transylvania Artists' Studio Tour from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. The arts center is at 321 S. Caldwell St. Tickets for the tour are $15 per person. For more information call 884-2787. 'Leave No Trace' workshop offered BREVARD -- The Cradle of Forestry historic site will offer a "Leave No Trace" educator workshop Saturday and Sunday designed for teachers, educators and Scout or recreation leaders. Educators can become certified to teach these skills to students, Scouts and campers. The program includes an overnight backpacking trip in Pisgah National Forest and will be led by two master trainers in Leave No Trace techniques. This workshop qualifies for NCEE criteria II or III and 1.2 CEUs. Registration is $40, including food and teaching materials. To register, call or e-mail Alice Cohen Goldstein at 877-3350, Ext. 203 or agoldstein@fs.fed.us. Watauga County Internet studies offered at Appalachian BOONE -- A new undergraduate concentration in Internet studies has been added to Appalachian State University's major in interdisciplinary studies. The goal is to provide students with the tools needed to be involved in policy-making decisions about Internet use, as well as practical experience with the technology. The concentration consists of 24 semester hours. Students take a minimum of nine semester hours from a list of technical/design courses, nine semester hours from a list of culture/politics courses, and a required seminar course. For more information, visit www.internetstudies.appstate.edu. Yancey County Battle of Burnsville program BURNSVILLE -- The Yancey County History Association invites the public to its fifth annual Battle of Burnsville weekend Friday and Saturday at the McElroy House in Burnsville. In April 1864, the town of Burnsville was invaded by what locals called "Tories." At 7 p.m Friday, interpreter Elizabeth Hardy will tell the story of the Battle for Burnsville from the perspective of one of the women who took part in the raid. On Saturday, interpreter Jim Priestmeyer will portray Mont Ray. At 2 p.m. interpreter Michael Hardy will restore order to the town through his portrayal of Palmer. For more information, call 682-3671. In April 1864, the town of Burnsville was invaded by what locals called "Tories." First came a group of 40 women who broke into the Confederate commissary and stole wheat. The next day, a group of 75 men led by a local Confederate deserter rode into town, wounding one Confederate soldier, taking weapons belonging to the state, stealing food and roughing up citizens. The town was saved a week later by a Mitchell County resident, Col. John B. Palmer.

04/01/2003
Regional Roundup
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Regional Roundup

Buncombe County Forum to focus on Asheville's assets ASHEVILLE -- The seventh and last in the current series of Leadership Asheville Forum's Critical Issues Luncheons will focus on several of Asheville's assets: Pack Square, The Thomas Wolfe House and a proposed mixed-use commercial development that would envelop a performing arts facility. Speakers at the forum will be Marilyn Geiselman for the Pack Square Project, Steve Hill for the Thomas Wolfe House and Crawford Murphy and Lilian Fischer for the proposed mixed-use commercial development. The luncheon is scheduled from noon to 1:30 p.m. April 9 at Country Club of Asheville. The cost is $14 for Leadership Asheville Forum members and $16 for nonmembers. Reserve your place by calling Marylyn Seyler at 645-6659 or e-mail ucanoe2@aol.com. Deadline for reservations is Friday. Members who have made reservations and fail to attend will be billed. Restaurant to donate to charity SKYLAND -- Bellacino's Restaurant, 1854 Hendersonville Road, will donate 10 percent of its income on Wednesday to the Save the Children campaign. The money will be in support of the third annual Youth Day of Peace to be held Aug. 1, bringing together children, adults and the elderly in an intergenerational peace rally. For more information, call Save the Children at 299-1166, Ext. 313. Talk to focus on N.C. budget SKYLAND -- Don Carrington, vice president of the John Locke Foundation, will speak about North Carolina's state budget problems and the solution of limited government at noon Friday at Shoney's Restaurant at the Long Shoals Road exit off Interstate 26. The event is part of the annual Tax Tour, sponsored by the John Locke Foundation and Citizens for a Sound Economy. For information, call Thomas Croom at the foundation at (866) JLF-INFO or e-mail tcroom@johnlocke.org Principal to talk about development ASHEVILLE -- Carol Ray, Claxton Elementary School principal, will discuss the School Development Program being implemented throughout the Asheville City Schools' System at 6 p.m. Wednesday at the Owen Conference Center at UNC Asheville. The School Development Program uses a "whole child approach" process to improve student development. For more information, call UNCA's education department at 251-6420. Lecture to explore calculus conflicts ASHEVILLE -- William Dunham, the Koehler Professor of Mathematics at Muhlenberg College, will discuss "Newton and Leibniz: Mathematicians at War" at 7 p.m. Thursday at UNC Asheville's Humanities Lecture Hall. Dunham's talk is the second annual Parson Lecture and is presented by UNCA's Mathematics Department. The event is free and open to the public. Dunham will trace the careers of England's Isaac Newton and Germany's Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, the geniuses who independently created calculus in the late 17th century. Dunham will describe the mathematicians' disputes and their dramatic outcomes. For more information, call UNCA's mathematics department at 251-6556. Fashion show to benefit charity ASHEVILLE -- Just Ducky Originals Children's Clothing will host a Welcome Spring! Fashion Show on Saturday at the 100 Charlotte St. store to benefit Children First. A portion of the day's proceeds will be donated to Children First. The store will be open from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. with live modeling and refreshments from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Just Ducky Originals Children's Clothing will also be raffling a Vera Bradley bag full of goodies before the event. Tickets are on sale at the store. For more information, call Allison Jordan with Children First at 259-9717. Novelist Rybka to speak at UNCA ASHEVILLE -- UNC Asheville will host a talk and book signing with novelist Laryce Harrison Rybka at 4 p.m. Wednesday in UNCA's Laurel Forum, Karpen Hall. The event, sponsored by UNCA's Diversity and Multicultural Affairs Office, is free and open to the public. "Guardian of the Lamp," Rybka's first book, is loosely based on her maternal grandmother's ancestry. The historical novel portrays three generations of women in antebellum South Carolina as they cross the line into forbidden love, advance the cause of abolitionism and work with the Underground Railroad. Rybka, a Raleigh native, is currently working on the sequel, "Legacy of the Lamp." For more information, call UNCA's diversity and multicultural affairs office at 232-5110. Leadership Asheville taking applications ASHEVILLE -- Leadership Asheville, a nine-month study program to strengthen leadership skills and understanding of community issues run by UNC Asheville, is accepting applications for its 2003-04 session. Following a two-day retreat in September, participants meet one day a month through May. Tuition is $1,200, and partial scholarships are available. Contact Mitchell Williams at 251-6125 or mwilliams@unca.edu for application materials or information. Henderson County 911 verification deadline extended HENDERSONVILLE -- The Henderson County Property Addressing office has extended the county's 911 database verification through April and has generated an e-mail address so people can e-mail their numbers and addresses to the office. If you have any questions, call Curtis Griffin, property address coordinator for Henderson County at 697-4916. Macon County EMS building to be dedicated TOPTON -- The Macon County Board of Commissioners will meet at 4 p.m. April 7 in the Nantahala EMS Building at 1096 Junaluska Road, Topton. A dedication and open house for the new EMS building will follow at 6 p.m. McDowell County Career planning and assessment offered MARION -- The JobLink Career Center in Marion will offer a career planning and assessment class Monday through April 11. The class is designed to help participants figure out what career direction to pursue. The class will be from 9 a.m. to noon and is free to unemployed and eligible individuals. For more information or to preregister, contact Jimmy Hensley at 659-6001, Ext. 105. Polk County Block House Steeplechase tickets on sale TRYON -- Tickets are now on sale for the 57th running of the Block House Steeplechase Races April 19 at the Sanlin Race Course at FENCE in Tryon. Gates will open at 10 a.m., with the first of five races beginning at 2 p.m. Parking spaces and boxes must be purchased in advance, and none will be sold on race day. Steeplechase tickets can be purchased in Asheville at Joseph Bank Clothiers and in Hendersonville at Boyd Pontiac-Cadillac-Buick. Call 859-6109 or (800) 438-3681.

04/01/2003
Senate Should Learn From History About Tax Cuts
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Senate Should Learn From History About Tax Cuts

© 2002 Copley News Service, 4/1/2003

04/01/2003
It’s Time to Permanently Eliminate Internet Access Taxes
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

It’s Time to Permanently Eliminate Internet Access Taxes

Washington, DC – Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) applauds the recent introduction of legislation that would permanently abolish harmful and discriminatory Internet access taxes. H.R. 49, the “Internet Tax Nondiscrimination Act” sponsored by Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Calif.) would permanently extend the moratorium on Internet access taxes. CSE President Paul Beckner had these comments:

04/01/2003
Groups Call for Independent Redistricting Commission for N.C.
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Groups Call for Independent Redistricting Commission for N.C.

BY Scott Mooneyham

A diverse group of lawmakers and public interest groups wants the General Assembly to abandon its current redistricting process and use an independent commission to draw political maps. "Fundamental to our system of government is the proposition that those elected should reflect the preferences of voters," said Sen. Hamilton Horton, R-Forsyth. "But this idea is regularly thwarted by partisans who seek to skew elections in their party's favor - what we call gerrymandering." Horton and Sen. Ellie Kinnaird, D-Orange, filed bills Monday that would create an independent commission to draw up new legislative and congressional district maps every 10 years. One of the bills would establish a constitutional amendment to ensure the commission operates into the future. Horton and Kinnaird were joined at a news conference by members of several public policy groups to support the legislation, including The John Locke Foundation, Common Cause of North Carolina, Citizens for a Sound Economy and the N.C. State Grange. The bill comes in response to a fight between Democrats and Republican over legislative districts that has lasted more than a year. Legislative Republicans challenged House and Senate maps drawn by Democrats, claiming they unconstitutionally split counties to gain a political advantage. The case is still pending before the state Supreme Court, although Republicans won several rulings in lower and appellate courts. Horton said the court fight is proof that an independent commission is needed. "The events of the past year should convince us, if we are honest with ourselves, that the General Assembly is simply incapable of redistricting itself fairly," he said. Both bills introduced by Horton and Kinnaird call for creating a nine-member redistricting commission. Members would be appointed by the governor, chief justice, House speaker and Senate president pro tem. Each would appoint two members, except for the governor, who would name three. Each person making appointments would have to include appointees from more than one political party. Chris Heagarty, director of the N.C. Center for Voter Education, said an independent commission might do away with many of the lengthy lawsuits that result from redistricting after each census. "It's like the political equivalent of the seven-year locusts, except it only comes every 10 years," Heagarty said.

03/31/2003
CCISD Could be Forced to Deal With School Vouchers Under Bill
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

CCISD Could be Forced to Deal With School Vouchers Under Bill

BY Monica Wolfson

AUSTIN - While it may appear that school vouchers have taken a backseat to more pressing legislative matters, it's still on the political radar and could be the focus of legislative debate before the session ends June 2. Both advocates for public school vouchers as well as opponents said vouchers have been overshadowed by the strains of balancing the state budget with its $9.9 billion shortfall, but the issue is not dead. "We think there is time to get it through," said Peggy Venable, executive director of Texas Citizens for a Sound Economy, a group that promotes the use of vouchers. "In terms of school choice, we think this legislation addresses parents who truly have no other option." Samantha Smoot, executive director of the Texas Freedom Network, an advocacy group that opposes vouchers, said she has never worked so hard on the issue. "(House) Speaker (Tom) Craddick and Gov. Rick Perry are making it clear to legislators that they view vouchers as a priority," Smoot said. "On the other hand, there is little public support for vouchers especially at a time when legislators are having trouble making ends meet paying for the basics. These two political realities are headed for a showdown." Just last week, the House Public Education Committee held its first hearing on public school vouchers inviting Nobel laureate economist Milton Friedman to testify in favor of vouchers. He said vouchers would improve public education by spurring competition for students between public and private schools. Voucher bill pending Left pending in committee was House Bill 2465, which is one of two voucher bills in the House. Bill author Kent Grusendorf, R-Arlington, is also the chairman of the Public Education Committee. HB 2465 allows school districts with more than 40,000 students with a majority of the student body being economically disadvantaged to offer families who make no more than 200 percent of the federal poverty level - or $36,000 for a family of four - vouchers to go to private schools. If a child goes to a private school, the private school would get 90 percent of state and local funds normally spent to educate the child in its public school district. The other 10 percent would go to the school district the child would have attended. Children who go to private schools using state money via vouchers would have to take standardized tests. Eleven districts qualify Eleven school districts would qualify for the voucher program, including two school districts in the El Paso area and three school districts in the Houston area. But in 2005, all the restrictions expire and all school districts in the state could participate in the voucher program so long as a majority of school board members approve it. All income requirements for participating families disappear as well. According to the Texas Education Agency, the Corpus Christi Independent School District had 39,138 students in 2001. Fifty-five percent of those students are economically disadvantaged. If Corpus Christi grew to 40,000 students, it would have to participate in the proposed public school voucher program, if the bill passed. Startup costs involved While the fiscal note attached to Grusendorf's bill says there would be no financial impact to the state, it also says the voucher program would cost the Texas Comptroller's Office $2 million in startup costs as well as almost $1 million per year for 11 full-time employees to administer the voucher program. The comptroller would be responsible for paying out the vouchers and monitoring whether private schools comply with the laws. The education agency estimated there are 22,800 private school slots available for the 639,000 children who would qualify. The agency also estimated 8,000 students would use vouchers in 2004 and 15,000 would use them in 2005. Local school districts shoulder the bulk of the financial burden for vouchers, according to the fiscal note. In 2004, the 11 school districts would lose a combined $40 million, while in 2005, they would forfeit $75 million. It would be difficult for school districts to cut operating expenses to cover the loss of revenue, especially if departing students come from throughout the district, the fiscal note said. Fears for school funding "If you can't afford to buy new textbooks or (pay for) teacher health insurance, can you afford a new expense to subsidize private schools?" said Carolyn Boyle, who heads up the Coalition for Public Schools, which is made up of school districts and other community groups that oppose vouchers. "I think legislators think they will look irresponsible if they vote for a private voucher bill." Boyle said she fears that if a voucher bill fails on the House floor, then voucher amendments might get slipped into other legislation. Venable, the head of the pro-voucher group, said forcing parents to put their children in a particular public school runs counter to free market principles. She also said $75 million is a small amount of money compared to the $26 billion per year the state and local communities spend on public education funding. "(Bureaucrats) are scared to death of parents having choices and would put any fiscal note on this they could," Venable said. "I think that is a stretch . . . I can't imagine there is going to be a negative impact. If you have one less child, but 10 percent of the money, you've got more money and less kids." Southern Methodist University political science professor Cal Jillson said he suspects lawmakers will be so consumed with balancing the budget that the voucher issue might remain on the back burner. "I think the fiscal situation to the state is so evidently dire that they are focusing on the budget," Jillson said. "There just isn't a lot of room for the social agenda of the Republican Party."

03/31/2003
Greensboro Habitat to Welcome Linda Fuller
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Greensboro Habitat to Welcome Linda Fuller

GREENSBORO - The Greensboro College chapter of Habitat for Humanity will hold a "Breakfast With Linda Fuller" from 7:30 to 8:30 a.m. April 7 in the Lea Center of Main Building. Fuller is a co-founder of Habitat for Humanity International. For more information or to reserve a seat at the breakfast, call Jacqueline Oates at 272-7102, Ext. 372, or write to joates@gborocollege.edu. Reservations must be made by Tuesday. Charles G. Adams to close lecture series Charles G. Adams, a renowned lecturer, will speak at 9:45 a.m. Thursday in the Dillard Auditorium of Anderson Conference Center at Winston-Salem State University. The lecture will conclude the 2002-03 James A. Gray "Religion and Ethics in 21st Century America" lecture series. Adams is the pastor of Hartford Memorial Baptist Church in Detroit. John Locke Foundation representative to speak N.C. Citizens for a Sound Economy and the John Locke Foundation will present "2003 Spring Tax Tour" at noon Thursday at Sagebrush Steak House & Saloon, 1750 S. Stratford Road. A representative from the John Locke Foundation will discuss the current state budget and taxes. For more information, call Rheta Burton at (919) 807-0100 or see the Web site www.cse.org /northcarolina Lewisville Town Council meeting time changed LEWISVILLE - The Lewisville Town Council meeting will begin at 4 p.m. instead of 5:30 p.m. Thursday at Lewisville Town Hall. A briefing will begin immediately after the meeting. Handicapped people requiring special accommodations may call the Lewisville Town Hall at 945-5558 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting to request assistance. Author will speak about 'Love Languages' Gary Chapman will speak about "The Five Love Languages of Children" at 7 p.m. Thursday at Pinedale Christian Church, 3395 Peters Creek Parkway. Chapman is a co-author of the book The Five Love Languages of Children and the author of The Five Love Languages. Admission is $7. The proceeds will go to Triad Academy, a private, nonprofit school for students with learning differences. To buy tickets, call Kathy Conner at 924-9247, Suzanne Hess at 766-1429, Sherri Holloway at 945-0554, Myra Mathis at 766-6826 or Triad Academy at 775-4900. Group to hold series about neighborhoods Neighbors for Better Neighborhoods will hold a "Neighborhood Institute for Community Leadership 2003" spring training series Thursday through Saturday at Adam's Mark Winston Plaza Hotel. The series will include such topics as creating neighborhoods of choice through revitalization, valuing community diversity and the real-estate development process. For more information, call Tamieka A. White at 631-9407.

03/31/2003
Coping With Econo-Myths
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

Coping With Econo-Myths

As published in The Washington Times, March 31, 2003 President Bush's $726 billion tax-cut plan was shot down in the Senate last week, a victim of economic ignorance, an addiction to big spending and the war in Iraq. The bad news: A distracted wartime president lost a key vote on the centerpiece of his domestic agenda, which, if it stands, may weaken future economic growth for the remainder of his term.

03/31/2003
Opponents, Supporters of EPA Changing NSR Rules Debate Issue
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Opponents, Supporters of EPA Changing NSR Rules Debate Issue

Proponents and foes of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's pursuit of dramatic changes to regulations governing how electric power plants and other industrial facilities maintain facilities and still meet Clean Air Act ''new source review'' rules squared-off in a quasi-debate Thursday, not surprisingly leaving neither side convinced of the validity of the other's points. The debate came before EPA's Monday public hearings on its plans to modify NSR rules, something industrial owners vehemently support and environmentalists and a number of state and local regulatory authorities sharply oppose. EPA late last year proposed a final rule to increase energy efficiency and encourage emissions reductions by trying to clarify what constitutes a modification to industrial facilities, so-called ''routine maintenance, repair and replacement,'' like when power plant owners maintain plants that may or may not trigger NSR rules under the Clean Air Act. The Bush administration's EPA thinks that confusion over NSR, and the filing of numerous lawsuits by the government against plant owners during the Clinton years, actually harmed pollution reduction efforts by confusing plant owners on what was legal and what was illegal under NSR, preventing modernization. Clean air groups think the Bush team is simply creating huge loopholes for plant owners to increase output and extend the lives of older facilities, producing more harmful emissions that hurt public health. C. Boyden Gray, a lawyer, chairman of Citizens for a Sound Economy and former counsel to President George H.W. Bush, fronted the utility industry's viewpoint that NSR needs radical alterations to clarify what it means and allow the marketplace to produce efficiencies that will drive down the amount of harmful plant pollutants. He noted that since 1990 the levels of sulpher dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) have gone down dramatically in the ''offending'' Midwest - where many older, coal-fired power plants are - and in Eastern states. The declines, Gray said, ''had nothing to do with NSR,'' but rather were a result of 1990 Clean Air Act amendments and market-based cap and trade programs. Gray lashed out at environmentalists, calling critics upset over NSR only because ''people don't want to see reductions (in industrial emissions) come through market incentives.'' On the other side, defenders of the current NSR rule asked Gray to tell them where in the Clean Air Act EPA had the authority to change the regulations, since the agency is supposed to work for reducing and not increasing pollution. John Walke, representing the Natural Resources Defense Council, said under the EPA modifications, state governments would lose their most effective tool to control smog, soot and toxic pollution. Environmentalists want EPA to rescind its rule before it becomes final. They also mocked the attempt under EPA's proposed changes to quantify through a replacement cost-based formula, the amount of maintenance work that could be done without triggering NSR.

03/28/2003
March Minuteman of the Month!
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW
Press Release

March Minuteman of the Month!

March’s Minuteman of the Month is John Hallman of Boca Raton, Florida. John became a Volunteer Chapter Leader (VCL) for CSE in south Florida in January and has gotten off to a great start!

03/28/2003

Pages