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Tax Fact #32: White House Drastically Understates Cost of Medicare Reform Proposal
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Press Release

Tax Fact #32: White House Drastically Understates Cost of Medicare Reform Proposal

Last month, President Clinton announced his plan for "reforming" Medicare, comprised mainly of transferring more tax dollars from the U.S. Treasury and expanding Medicare to include a prescription drug benefit. The administration, however, apparently understated its cost estimates to deflect criticism of the plan. Medicare already costs $210 billion annually, and is projected to cost nearly $500 billion in ten years (without adding any new benefits).

01/01/2001
The Presidential Debate: Gore vs. Reality
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Press Release

The Presidential Debate: Gore vs. Reality

Reality Check Presidential Debate Governor George W. Bush vs. Vice President Gore US Energy Policy Al Gore vs. Reality I want to free America from its dependency on Big Oil. Gore’s plan will not free Americans from anything. It will only continue to make energy and fuel more expensive. We are still decades away from finding alternatives to fossil fuels. This search needs to continue. However, reliance on failed Carter-era energy schemes does not make for sound energy policy.

01/01/2001
Ex-Clinton Aides Admit Kyoto Treaty Flawed
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Press Release

Ex-Clinton Aides Admit Kyoto Treaty Flawed

Originally ran on June 11, 2001 on USA TODAY's website. WASHINGTON — As President Bush headed off Monday to face environmental critics in Europe, he fired a parting shot at the global warming treaty he has rejected. He called the Kyoto Protocol unrealistic, costly and "fatally flawed." In that assessment, he has some unexpected supporters: Clinton administration experts.

01/01/2001
No Internet Tax: Why Internet Sales Taxes Aren't Necessary
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Press Release

No Internet Tax: Why Internet Sales Taxes Aren't Necessary

Click here to sign CSE's No Internet Tax Petition Ten years ago, discount retailers like Wal-Mart were redefining the face of the American retail industry. Today, online retailers like Amazon.com are again redefining not only ways that businesses interact with their customers, but also how they interact with each other. Two years ago, Congress passed a three-year moratorium on new Internet taxes to help the fledgling market grow. In the interim, the battle to create an Internet tax plan has begun.

01/01/2001
PNTR Letter to Congress
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Press Release

PNTR Letter to Congress

March 21, 2000 Dear Member of Congress: International trade promotes individual and economic freedom at home and abroad. Therefore, on behalf of the 250,000 members of Citizens for a Sound Economy, I urge you to support permanent normal trade relations (PNTR) with the People’s Republic of China. By supporting PNTR, you are demonstrating your support for American consumers, farmers, and business owners.

01/01/2001
CSE President Paul Beckner Sent a Letter to All House Judiciary Committee Members Regarding H.R. 1697, "Broadband Competition an
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Press Release

CSE President Paul Beckner Sent a Letter to All House Judiciary Committee Members Regarding H.R. 1697, "Broadband Competition an

May 21, 2001 Dear Representative: Punitive and retaliatory, H.R. 1697, "Broadband Competition and Incentives Act of 2001" and H.R. 1698 "American Broadband Competition Act of 2001," turn back the clock on telecommunications deregulation and threaten to destroy the broadband marketplace. I strongly urge that you oppose both pieces of legislation, either as stand-alone bills or if offered as amendments to other legislation pending before the House.

01/01/2001
Citizens Rally in Defense of Judge’s Salmon Ruling
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Press Release

Citizens Rally in Defense of Judge’s Salmon Ruling

In a victory for sound science, a federal judge in Eugene recently ruled that the National Marine and Fisheries Service (NMFS) could no longer list Oregon coastal coho salmon as endangered. U.S. District Judge Michael R. Hogan ruled that NMFS erred by not including hatchery- bred salmon in determining endangered species listings. The federal government, NMFS, and environmental groups are considering appealing the case.

01/01/2001
Role Posed for Miller in Redistricting
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Role Posed for Miller in Redistricting

BY Rob Christensen

Senate President Pro Tem Marc Basnight is looking for a new chairman to lead the Senate part of drawing new election districts next year and has approached Sen. Brad Miller, a Raleigh Democrat, about the job. "He is considering that," Basnight said. "I haven't said you can have anything. He is considering if he would like me to consider him." Sen. Roy Cooper, a Rocky Mount Democrat who has served as Senate redistricting chairman in recent years, is leaving the Senate to become state attorney general.

12/29/2000
New Congress Will Face Important Internet Issues
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New Congress Will Face Important Internet Issues

Online privacy, taxation and copyright reform are among three key Internet-related issues on the agenda when the new Congress begins work as early as next month, The Washington Post reported Friday. Even though dot-com stock values are plummeting and new-economy layoffs have become part of a daily news cycle, there is little doubt the Internet is having a fundamental impact on the way the nation lives and does business. Consumers this year are expected to spend $10 billion this year buying products online, the newspaper said.

12/29/2000
New Congress Could Tackle Important Internet Issues
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New Congress Could Tackle Important Internet Issues

BY Christopher Stern

The new economy kept Congress busy this year. It held more than two dozen Web-related hearings and passed bills increasing the number of foreign high-tech workers allowed to immigrate to the United States and giving electronic contracts the same legal footing as those written in pen and ink. But when the new Congress begins work as early as next month, lobbyists will be stalking the halls on a variety of Internet-related matters, including three key issues: online privacy, Internet taxation and copyright reform.

12/29/2000

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