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Classes
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Classes

CHAIR CANING The Pioneer Settlement for the Creative Arts in Barberville will offer classes on chair caning taught by Dave Bishop. A chair analysis session will be offered from 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday. Participants should bring a chair that they would like to cane so that the need for materials can be determined. Classes are to begin March 3. Tuition is $31.50 for members and $35 for nonmembers, and it does not include the cost of materials. Details: 386-749-2959. CLOGGING The New Wave Cloggers will have dancing classes at 6 p.m. Monday at the Sanford Chamber of Commerce, 400 E. First Street. Those enrolling will receive personalized instruction while learning the basic steps of the traditional dance form. Several easy dances will be taught. The first class is free. Participants need to wear comfortable, smooth-bottom shoes. Details: 386-775-4155 or newwave.clogdancing.com. CLUBS GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY The Volusia County Genealogical Society will meet at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Volusia County Library Center at City Island in Daytona Beach. June Byrne of the Family History Center will present a program titled "June's Favorite Links -- All New." Details: Sharon Yates at 386-253-8924. PULASKI CLUB The Polish American Pulaski Club, 3621 W. International Speedway Blvd., Daytona Beach, will have a dinner and dance Feb. 23. Dinner will be served at 1 p.m. Music by the Marc Bouchard Orchestra will begin at 2 p.m. The cost is $11 for members, $13 for nonmembers or $8 for those wanting to dance only. Dinner reservations are required. Reservations or details: 386-258-7059. GATOR CLUB The Gator Club of Volusia County will meet Thursday at the Deck Down Under, 78 Dunlawton Ave., Port Orange, just under the Port Orange-Dunlawton Bridge. Marty Cohen, editor of Gator Bait Magazine, will talk about Gator football recruiting. The social hour begins at 5 p.m. and the meeting at 6 p.m. Admission is free to members, $5 for nonmembers. Details: 386-451-0719 or 386-756-3912. FEBRUARY DANCE The Carmen Costa Quartet will set the tune for a dance from 7 to 9:30 p.m. Feb. 23 at the City Island Recreation Hall, 110 Orange Ave. in Daytona Beach. Jazz, blues, Latin, Glenn Miller tunes and some country favorites will be featured. Admission is $5. Tickets may be purchased at the door. Refreshments are included. Details: 386-441-0188. SOUND ECONOMY CHAPTER A local chapter of Citizens for a Sound Economy has been started. Membership is open to all county residents. A trip to Tallahassee is planned for early April. Meeting dates and location: 386-734-3624. GREEN PARTY The Green Party of Volusia County will meet from 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday at the Port Orange Library, 1005 City Center Circle. Details: David LeBlanc at 386-428-5136 or 386-405-5137. NAVY LEAGUE The Daytona Beach Navy League will sponsor a Coast Guard Appreciation Dinner on Thursday at the Palmetto Club, 1000 Beach St., Daytona Beach. The social hour is at 6 p.m., and dinner and the program begin at 7 p.m. The guest speaker will be Adm. J.S. Carmichael of the Seventh Coast Guard District. All personnel from the Ponce Inlet-New Smyrna Beach Base are expected to attend. The cost is $20. Dinner entree choices are prime rib or orange roughie. The public is invited. Reservations: Marilyn Harmon at 386-322-9540. REPUBLICAN CLUB The Ormond Beach Area Republican Club will meet at noon Tuesday at Red Lobster, 2735 N. Atlantic Ave. in Daytona Beach. The club president is Bob Dahlen. All Republicans are invited to join. Annual dues are $10. Details: 386-441-7878. HOPEBUILDERS DINNER Millard Fuller, Habitat for Humanity International's founder and president, will be the keynote speaker at the Halifax Habitat for Humanity's HopeBuilders Dinner. The public is invited to hear Fuller discuss the need for affordable housing in the Halifax area and the "Build Them by the Dozen" campaign. The dinner will be at 7 p.m. Thursday at the Plaza Resort and Spa, 600 N. Atlantic Ave. in Daytona Beach. Tickets for the dinner are $45. Before dinner, Fuller will be the guest of honor at a cocktail party and book signing from 6 to 7 p.m. Tickets are $75 and include dinner and an autographed copy of Building Materials for Life." Tickets to the cocktail party are limited. Reservations or details: 386-257-9950 or halifaxhabitat.org. WALKING CLUB The Happy Wanderers Walking Club will have a walk at Ravine State Gardens in Palatka on Saturday. The walk may be started at the pavilion between 8:30 and 11:30 a.m. and must be finished by 2:30 p.m. Walkers may choose either a 5K or 10K route. Written directions are available. The walk will be within the gardens and through the Palatka Historic District on trails, stone steps, dirt, sidewalks and asphalt. The trail is not suitable for wheelchairs or strollers. The cost is $3 for all walkers, with a parking fee of $3.25 per car. Lunch is available for $4.50. Directions or information: Lois Shannon at 386-788-8430 or Marvin Stokes at 386-788-4026. MUSEUMS ASIAN DINOSAURS Opening Saturday and on display through June 22, "The Great Asian Dinosaurs" will be on exhibit at the Museum of Arts and Sciences. The museum is at 1040 Museum Blvd., Daytona Beach. Hours: Tuesday through Friday 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. First Tuesday of each month, 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. Closed Mondays and holidays. Admission is $7 for adults, $2 for children and students with identification. Museum admission is free on Tuesdays for Florida residents with proof of residency. Admission is discounted $1 on Saturdays for Volusia County residents with proof of residency. Details: 386-255-0285 or moas.org. HEALTH CARDIAC RISK CHECKS The Women's HealthCare Center at Florida Hospital DeLand, is offering a cardiac risk analysis every Tuesday and Thursday from 3 to 4 p.m. The screening includes a cholesterol test and a consultation with a registered nurse specializing in cardiac health and wellness. The cost is $10. To apply for a screening, call the center at 386-943-4607. HEALTH SCREENINGS Florida Hospital DeLand's laboratory department will offer health screenings from 8 to 10 a.m. Wednesday in Classroom A on the first floor. Testing includes prostate screening, $20; cholesterol testing, $6; glucose testing, $6; and cardiac risk profiles, $14. Appointments are not necessary. Glucose and cholesterol testing as well as cardiac risk profiles require a 12-hour fast. The hospital is at 701 W. Plymouth Ave. Details: 386-943-4620. BLOOD DONATIONS The American Red Cross needs blood donors. Anyone at least 17 years old, weighing 110 pounds and in generally good health may be an eligible donor. All donor types are needed. Donations can be made at the following locations: Monday, 2 to 7 p.m., The Casements, Riverside Drive at Granada Boulevard, Ormond Beach. Wednesday, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Central Florida Career Center, Bank of America Building, North Woodland Boulevard, DeLand. The American Red Cross Donor Center, 341 White St., Daytona Beach, is open Monday through Thursday from noon to 7 p.m., Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Walk-in donors will be accommodated at all locations. Appointments: 386-226-1433, Ext. 144. LIBRARIES 'LET'S TALK ABOUT IT' The DeLand Area Public Library, 130 E. Howry Ave., is presenting a lecture and discussion series, "Encore! More Books by Award-Winning Authors." A winner of the Los Angeles Times book award for fiction and the Mountain and Plains Bookseller Association Award, Pigs in Heaven by Barbara Kingsolver will be discussed at 10:15 a.m. Friday in the auditorium. The program will be presented by Ellen Smith of Stetson University's English department. Details: 386-822-6430. PLANT TALK Master gardeners will present a free talk on "Soil and pH: Build Your Garden from the Ground Up" from 10 to 11 a.m. Wednesday at the Ormond Beach Public Library, 30 S. Beach St. After the presentation, the gardeners will answer questions and accept water and soil samples to be taken to the Volusia County Extension Service for analysis. The cost is $1 for three samples. Details: 386-822-5778. SUPPORT GROUPS ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDER A support group for parents of children with Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and related behavioral difficulties will be offered Wednesday at Florida Hospital DeLand. Angel R. Epstein, a therapist at Counseling Associates of Ormond Beach, and a parent of two children with ADD, leads the group, which meets from 6 to 7:15 p.m. in Classroom 1A. The cost is $5 per person. Details: 386-672-1776. LUPUS The Lupus Foundation of America Inc., Volusia/Flagler support group meets from 1 to 3 p.m. at Memorial Hospital Ormond Beach, 875 Sterthaus Ave., on Saturday. The guest speaker will be C.S. Wang, a physical therapist. The meeting will be on the second floor above the Emergency Room entrance and is open to the public. Details: 386-761-0066 or 1-800-684-9276. SPINAL CORD INJURY The Neuroscience Center at Halifax Medical Center will offer a self-help group for spinal cord injury patients. The group will meet from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. Friday in the third-floor conference room of the 201 Building, 201 N. Clyde Morris Blvd., on the Halifax Medical Center main campus in Daytona Beach. The facilitators will be Dr. Carolyn Geis, and Candy Clevenger, a registered nurse. The group is open to those who have had a spinal cord injury and their family members. Details: 386-947-4641. FESTIVALS, SHOWS FESTA ITALIANA Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church, 201 University Blvd., Daytona Beach, will present Festa Italiana this week. Events include rides, games, prizes, crafts and dancing, as well as a variety of Italian dishes. Hours are 5 to 9 p.m. Thursday; 5 p.m. to midnight Friday; noon to midnight Saturday; and noon to 5 p.m. Feb. 23. Unlimited ride tickets are available in advance for $35. Details or tickets: 386-252-0391 or 386-255-0433. STORIES FROM THE HEART The Sandcastle Storytellers will present the seventh annual Stories from the Heart at 7:30 p.m. Saturday at the Sands Theater Center, 600 N. Woodland Blvd. in DeLand. The evening will include 10 stories plus a tandem tale and an ensemble story. Tickets are $5 for general admission and $4 for senior citizens and children. FUND-RAISERS RELAY FOR LIFE The American Cancer Society is recruiting teams to participate in Relay for Life, a fund-raising walkathon. Last year, more than 2 million Americans participated, and more than 350,000 cancer survivors walked the opening laps. Six events are planned for Volusia and Flagler counties this spring. Families, clubs, schools, businesses, churches, service groups, health-care professionals and others may form teams. All money raised will go to cancer research and local patient services. Registration has begun. Details: 386-253-1633 in Daytona Beach, 386-734-7836 in west Volusia; or visit cancer.org and click on Florida. 2003 HEART BALL The American Heart Association 2003 Heart Ball "Leather & Lace" will be at 6 p.m. Saturday at the Adam's Mark Resort, 100 N. Atlantic Ave. in Daytona Beach. To recognize his commitment and dedication in developing Volusia County's first open-heart surgery program, the American Heart Association will pay tribute to Dr. Jack E. Arrants. The evening includes cocktails, dinner, dancing and an auction. Entertainment will be provided by Derek and the Slammers. Tickets are $125. Proceeds will fund cardiovascular research and public education. Last year's event raised more than $40,000. Reservations or details: 386-676-0001. SENIORS CENTER IN ORANGE CITY Wava's Hall, the senior center at 200 N. Holly Ave., offers activities and classes to anyone 55 or older. Hours are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Membership is $10 a year for Orange City residents and $12 for nonresidents. Details: 386-775-3121. DANCES The Ormond Beach Senior Center, 351 Andrews St., has dances Wednesdays from 1 to 3 p.m. and Sundays from 2 to 4 p.m. with a rotating schedule of bands. A birthday and anniversary dance is presented once a month. The cost is $3. Details: 386-676-3256. ARTHRITIS SELF-HELP COURSE The Volusia County Health Department and the Arthritis Foundation will offer a free course in arthritis self-help at the Ormond Beach Senior Center beginning Thursday. The six-week course will meet from 10 a.m. to noon through March 27. Participants will learn about basic aspects of arthritis, exercise, nutritional habits and stress management. Registration is required. Details: Susan Squires at 386-274-0607. OUTDOORS SAND SPURS BEEP BASEBALL The Florida Sand Spurs Beep Baseball team, sponsored by the Halifax Council for the Blind and the Center for the Visually Impaired is seeking blind and visually impaired players as well as sighted support team members. The team will practice weekly and will play in competitive team sports with any group willing to compete. The goal is to compete in the World Series National Beep Baseball Association games. Details or registration: 386-677-3995 or 386-253-8879. TAX ASSISTANCE Counseling sites The AARP Tax Aide counseling assistance program has trained volunteers to help prepare tax returns and assist with filing requirements for older taxpayers. Volunteers are scheduled to be at the following locations through April 15: DeBary Public Library, 200 N. Charles R. Beall Blvd., on Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Deltona Regional Library, 2150 Eustace Ave., on Mondays from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Fridays from noon to 4 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. DeLand Lutheran Retirement Center, 450 N. McDonald Ave., the second and fourth Thursdays of the month from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. DeLand Area Public Library, 130 E. Howry Ave., on Mondays, Wednesdays and Thursdays from noon to 4 p.m. Taxpayers should bring a copy of their 2002 tax return and Social Security cards for themselves, spouse and dependents. The service is not limited to AARP members.

02/16/2003
Additional Tort Reform May Be Ahead
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Press Release

Additional Tort Reform May Be Ahead

From the Charleston Daily Mail February 15, 2003, Saturday Copyright 2003 Charleston Newspapers

02/15/2003
Texas House Civil Practices Chairman Joe Nixon’s Omnibus Tort Reform Bill is Good For Texas, Good for Texas Citizens
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Press Release

Texas House Civil Practices Chairman Joe Nixon’s Omnibus Tort Reform Bill is Good For Texas, Good for Texas Citizens

Texas CSE commends House Civil Practices Committee Chairman Joe Nixon for filing House Bill 4, an omnibus civil justice reform bill. CSE’s policy position Litigious trial lawyers rob decent, honest Americans of their money, trust and peace of mind. Fear of lawsuit impacts our daily lives both at the workplace, at home and while enjoying recreational activities. It’s time to finish the civil justice reforms began in Texas. Highlights of Chairman Nixon’s legislation and impacts on consumers are:

02/14/2003
Pass the President's Economic Package
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Press Release

Pass the President's Economic Package

***** Treasury Secretary John Snow makes strong statement on the President's plan -- text follows: UNITED STATES TREASURY SECRETARY JOHN W. SNOW REMARKS TO THE DETROIT ECONOMIC CLUB FEBRUARY 13, 2003 DETROIT, MICHIGAN

02/13/2003
Senator Chafee: Making Life Difficult for the President and the Party
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Press Release

Senator Chafee: Making Life Difficult for the President and the Party

Breaking ranks with your caucus and the president’s agenda is nothing new for politicians, but in times such as these, when control of Congress is separated by a few seats, every vote taken or opinion expressed that goes against the party’s position can create seismic disturbances.

02/13/2003
A Look at Reaction to State of the State Address
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A Look at Reaction to State of the State Address

Quotes from legislators and others after Gov. Rick Perry's State of the State address on Tuesday: "He has a new view from the top. ... We are rebuilding the engine and we are starting from zero." - Sen. Florence Shapiro, R-Plano. "It's unfortunate that it took a month of pressure for the governor to propose cuts. One-fifth of the session is over, OK here's what he wants to cut. Now it'll take us a while to digest that. I think any proposal he makes is a good one, because he hasn't made one before today." - Rep. Jim Dunnam, D-Waco, chairman of the House Democratic Caucus. "We'll reach a consensus on what are essential services and then at the end of the day we'll balance the budget because I believe we share the governor's commitment to balancing our budget, maintaining essential services and not raising new taxes." - Republican Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst. "The governor's recommendations seemed to be a little hard in their hits on higher education. But again, we're going to look very carefully at this during our budget process." - Dewhurst. "We will consider every recommendation as is on the table. But for every recommendation that is made, we will not only look at it seriously but also raise questions about the impact. ... We don't want to be penny wise and pound foolish." - Sen. Judith Zaffirini, D-Laredo. "Job creation is important and I support his efforts to bring jobs to Texas. But if we want to reap the benefits of economic security and fiscal responsibility we must first invest in the health and education of our children." - Rep. Pete Gallego, D-Alpine, chairman of the Mexican American Legislative Caucus. "I agree with the governor's comment that there is no clear solution currently on the table regarding school finance. That is why many of the members from both parties are wary of doing away with our school funding without an existing alternative." - Gallego. "Gov. Perry talked to families when he vowed to set spending priorities and live within the available funds, just as families are doing." - Peggy Venable, director of Texas Citizens for a Sound Economy. "We view the governor's message as a positive sign that he will follow through on his promise not to cut education funding, and in fact plans to increase spending on our students. We are pleased that, despite the budget shortfall, the governor recognizes that education is the greatest investment we can make in the prosperity of Texas." - Doug Rogers, executive director of the Association of Texas Professional Educators. "Governor Perry is to be commended for making access to affordable health care for all Texans a priority. ... The Legislature must put the brakes on out-of-control health care lawsuit abuse and skyrocketing malpractice premiums." - Kirsten Voinis, spokeswoman for Citizens Against Lawsuit Abuse of Central Texas. "Perry is acting on the will of the people, the pleas of the small business owner and the demands of the state by balancing a budget that some say is impossible to reconcile without raising taxes. ... It's time to take a hard look at every dollar the state spends just like every Texas family." - Bill Hammond, president of the Texas Association of Business. "I'm afraid you're looking at denying people health care." - Scott McCown, executive director of the Center for Public Policy Priorities.

02/13/2003
Social Security Means a Strong Economy
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Press Release

Social Security Means a Strong Economy

Working in the shadows of the Iraq crisis, the president’s economic team has produced an ambitious agenda to strengthen the American economy. Both proponents and opponents have discussed at length the tax proposals announced by President Bush. However, other proposals deserve attention as well, especially the president’s approach to savings and his continued commitment to reforming the nation’s Social Security system.

02/12/2003
Some Doubt Governor's Resolve
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Some Doubt Governor's Resolve

BY W. Gardner Selby

AUSTIN - Within 30 days, Texans will know if Republican leaders are sticking to budget-cutting plans or bending to pressure for increased taxes, a GOP leader said Tuesday. "Within the next month, we'll have a sense as to whether we have people bolting or not," said Rep. Talmadge Heflin of Houston, chairman of the budget-drafting House Appropriations Committee. "The ones that fold will have to be the leadership-the speaker, the lieutenant governor, the governor," Heflin said, referring to House Speaker Tom Craddick, Lt. Gov. David Dewhurst and Gov. Rick Perry. "If heat comes on them to where they say, you know, we can't do this, then we're screwed," Heflin said, adding he expects the leadership to stick together and "get the job done." Republican leaders have vowed to achieve a 2004-05 budget that absorbs a projected revenue shortfall of $9.9 billion without requiring additional taxes, possibly spending less than the $117 billion earmarked in the 2002-03 budget that runs through August. In his State of the State address Tuesday, Perry gave no indication of giving ground, saying voters "elected us to set priorities, not to raise the price of government," adding: "My friends, it can be done. We can balance our budget without raising taxes." Dewhurst, informed of Heflin's comments, said: "If we stand together, Democrats and Republicans alike, we can balance the budget without new taxes." Craddick, R-Midland, said: "I'm not bolting." "The three of us will stay together all the way through," Craddick said. "I don't think there's any doubt about that." Heflin supports a proposal to abolish the state's share-the-wealth public school funding system by 2005. He wants immediate research into overhauling the tax system so the 2005 Legislature can consider ideas like replacing property and franchise taxes with an expanded state sales tax. In early April, the House likely will take up a draft of the budget recommended by his committee, Heflin said. If approved, it will head to the Senate, whose members will probably substitute their own version and clear the way for House-Senate negotiations before the session ends June 2. Heflin on Tuesday asked the Texas Association of School Boards to support a lean budget along with his desire to overhaul school funding and taxes in 2005. "I'm asking that you partner with us to do that," he said. John McInnis, an Arlington school board member and past president of TASB, later objected. Describing himself as a moderate Republican, McInnis said: "If they're not going to come up with new resources to pay the bills, my question is: Who cuts where?" "They're going to bolt," McInnis predicted of the GOP leaders. "They simply have to. It's going to be an interesting rhetorical dilemma for the governor to wade out of." Peggy Venable, state director of Citizens for a Sound Economy, disagreed, saying taxpayers will need to remind the leaders that they are spending taxpayer dollars and not money that belongs to government. "Chairman Heflin is absolutely right," Venable said. "They are going to have to be steadfast in their focus on cutting spending and addressing the needs of Texas." The Austin-based Center for Public Policy Priorities, which advocates for programs serving poor Texans, noted Tuesday that health, education and criminal justice agencies are being asked to chop more than $4.5 billion from their budgets before taking them to legislative budget-drafting panels. Scott McCown, the center's executive director, called Heflin's comments "the best news I've had all day." "When fellows start telling you that they're not going to bolt, that means people have been talking to them about the desperate need to raise revenue," McCown said. "A lot of people are using their access to leadership with a private message that this is going to be devastating to balance the budget without additional revenue." "That means he's having to keep an eye on them, that things are happening," McCown said.

02/12/2003
The President's Recipe to Cook Up More Capital
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Press Release

The President's Recipe to Cook Up More Capital

© 2002 Copley News Service, 2/11/2003 For every rule, there is an exception that proves it. "There's no such thing as a free lunch" is a good example. There is a "free lunch" when you discover that its makings are already bought and paid for but foolishly wasted or spoiled before they can be combined into a nourishing meal. If you change whatever is causing the waste and spoilage, presto, you've got a free lunch.

02/11/2003
Governor Rick Perry’s State of the State Speech
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Press Release

Governor Rick Perry’s State of the State Speech

Governor Perry demonstrated strong leadership by showing we can balance our budget without raising taxes. He indicated his desire to work with the legislature to achieve that goal, and we stand ready to work with him to limit government. Since 1990, the Texas population has grown by 27 percent and inflation has increased 37 percent. Yet during that same time period, the state's budget increased 125 percent and state spending on Medicaid jumped 400 percent. In 2001, the Legislature increased spending on health and human services programs by $4 billion.

02/11/2003

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