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Trade, Jobs, and Manufacturing
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Press Release

Trade, Jobs, and Manufacturing

ABSTRACT FROM CATO Imports, contrary to popular opinion, have no negative effects on the overall employment level, and most Americans do not work in sectors that face competetion from imports. By trading for goods that can be produced at a relatively cheaper price abroad, the United States must focus on producing goods and services that can be produced at a relatively cheaper price domestically. Therefore, trade encourages investment in those sectors with higher worker productivity, and consequently, higher wges and salaries. Most Americans work in service sectors that face little or no import competition, and for them, imports give more choice for consumers, encourage innovation, and raise wages. Workers in manufactoring and farming sectors that have some import competition make up a small percentage of total workers. In fact, technology and other factors caused more lost jobs than imports did. Trade barriers do not save jobs, and thus policy should encourage creating new jobs.

09/30/1999
E-Rate: Prepared Statement of Kent Lassman before the Commerce Committtee's Subcommittee on Telecommunications, Trade, and Consu
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Press Release

E-Rate: Prepared Statement of Kent Lassman before the Commerce Committtee's Subcommittee on Telecommunications, Trade, and Consu

Introduction "For every old blackboard there are now hundreds of new electronic computers." So said President Dwight Eisenhower in his televised farewell address on January 17th, 1961. Of course, this speech is more famous for Eisenhower’s warning to "guard against the acquisition of unwarranted influence, whether sought or unsought, by the military-industrial complex."

09/30/1999
Tech Fact #3 - Consumers to Politicians: No Internet Tax
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Capitol Comment

Tech Fact #3 - Consumers to Politicians: No Internet Tax

As President Clinton vetoes Congress’s tax cut – thereby rejecting American values of hard work, thrift and marriage – other politicians in Congress and the state houses would increase taxes, despite record budget surpluses at the federal and state levels. Why tax the Internet? Well, that’s where the money is these days, right? Politicians see the large numbers associated with E-commerce and get greedy. They claim they are "losing" tremendous amounts of money because sales taxes do not apply to most Internet transactions. However, this claim is based on rhetoric, not facts.1

09/23/1999
A Beacon for High Tech
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Press Release

A Beacon for High Tech

Technical graduates of Stanford or Cal in the late '50s and early '60s were deluged with job offers from aerospace and defense companies working on Cold War missile systems and the Apollo program aimed at putting people on the moon. Graduates without citizenship, however, did not qualify for the aerospace jobs and, as a result, found their way to commercial companies such as Fairchild Semiconductor, where I worked. At Fairchild these engineers and scientists, speaking with many different dialects, were laying the foundation for what we know today as Silicon Valley, the technological capital of the world, a capital built by people of many different nationalities.

09/18/1999
Capitol Comment 254 - When the Government Sues: How to Defend Against the Threat to Liberty
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 254 - When the Government Sues: How to Defend Against the Threat to Liberty

Most people understand that government programs—whether in the form of public schools, Medicare, disaster relief, crop subsidies, or a myriad of other things—cost money. High rates of taxation are the price we pay for the social goods that flow from the welfare state. Less obvious is the price that the state’s largesse exacts on personal liberty.

09/17/1999
Capitol Comment 253 - Taxing Disaster Reserves is Disastrous
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 253 - Taxing Disaster Reserves is Disastrous

A constant refrain from opponents of tax cuts is that the federal budget surplus should be "invested" in programs such as Social Security, Medicare, and education. Planning responsibly for the future, they insist, requires that government spend the surplus rather than return it to the taxpayers. But when it comes to planning for natural disasters, Washington has developed a policy whose costs are so prohibitive that the private sector cannot even attempt prudent planning for the future.

09/16/1999
Capitol Comment 252 - No Internet Tax: Why Internet Sales Taxes Aren’t Necessary
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 252 - No Internet Tax: Why Internet Sales Taxes Aren’t Necessary

Ten years ago, discount retailers like Wal-Mart were redefining the face of the American retail industry. Today, online retailers like Amazon.com are again redefining not only the ways that businesses interact with their customers, but also how they interact with each other. Two years ago, Congress passed a three-year moratorium on new Internet taxes to help the fledgling market grow. In the interim, the battle to create an Internet tax plan has begun.

09/16/1999
Teachers, Principals or Lawyers?
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Press Release

Teachers, Principals or Lawyers?

Reprinted with permission from Investor's Business Daily Like your pants extra baggy? Good thing you're not going to school in Boone County, Ky., where one high school has banned students from wearing pants that drag on the floor. Not just because they're sloppy. Because someone could trip and get hurt. And then sue.

09/16/1999
Capitol Comment 251 - Rapid-Fire Assault on the Separation of Powers
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 251 - Rapid-Fire Assault on the Separation of Powers

Quietly and without much fanfare, state supreme courts across the nation are subtly taking powers from state legislatures. Traditionally, state legislatures, which are most accountable to the electorate, pass laws and state supreme courts, which are less accountable, interpret these laws. For years state supreme courts have exercised "judicial restraint;" i.e., even if the court thought the legislature created bad policy, the separation of powers doctrine mandated that the court defer to the legislature’s judgment.

09/09/1999
CSE LAUNCHES NEW HAMPSHIRE CHAPTER
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Press Release

CSE LAUNCHES NEW HAMPSHIRE CHAPTER

Today, Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) Foundation announced the launch of their New Hampshire chapter. “New Hampshire Citizens for a Sound Economy will create a permanent presence for the growing numbers of CSE members in the Granite State. Currently, over 1,000 residents are already involved,” said Paul Beckner, CSE Foundation President. “A strong independent voice for taxpayers is needed in New Hampshire because there is a real threat to the ‘New Hampshire advantage’ – one where the state’s prosperity had been linked to the absence of broad-based taxes.”

09/08/1999

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