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Citizens for PERS Reform PAC Announces Fall Voter Education Campaign
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Press Release

Citizens for PERS Reform PAC Announces Fall Voter Education Campaign

Oregon Citizens for a Sound Economy (OR CSE) and Citizens for PERS Reform PAC (CPR PAC), an affiliate of OR CSE, announced today that they will be conducting an education campaign for Oregon voters on the immediate and growing fiscal crisis of the Public Employees Retirement System (PERS). OR CSE director Russ Walker had these comments:

09/18/2002
Democrat Goes on the Offensive in TV Ad
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Democrat Goes on the Offensive in TV Ad

BY Jeff Mapes

Summary: Gubernatorial candidate Ted Kulongoski takes Republican Kevin Mannix to task for his "extreme" position on abortion Shrugging off criticism he's trying to shift attention from Oregon's troubled economy, Democrat Ted Kulongoski on Tuesday launched his fall advertising in the governor's race with a blistering attack on Republican Kevin Mannix's opposition to abortion rights. Kulongoski's decision to immediately go on the attack is unusual. Candidates usually focus their first commercials on warm-and-fuzzy biographical spots extolling their virtues, particularly when they lead in the polls as Kulongoski has. But Kulongoski has been roughed up by an ad run by an independent group attacking the Democrat's support for a tax increase, and his campaign strategists think Mannix is particularly vulnerable on abortion given Oregon's reputation as a state that staunchly defends abortion rights. Mannix spokesman Mike Beard said that Kulongoski -- who earlier this month held a high-profile news conference to attack Mannix on abortion -- is once again trying to shift the subject from more important issues. "Try telling the people with the pink slips right now that Ted Kulongoski's No. 1 concern is abortion," said Beard, arguing that Kulongoski doesn't want to focus on how to improve the economy and get the state out of its budget crisis. Kulongoski spokeswoman Kristen Grainger made no apologies for focusing on abortion. "Kevin Mannix sees it as a red herring," she said. "We see it as a great white that's going to bite him. . . . When he calls it a red herring, he's insulting the intelligence of the pro-choice voters of this state." Kulongoski also began re-airing a biographical spot from the primary. But Grainger said most of the TV time bought by the campaign would be de voted to the abortion ad, which claims Mannix is "too extreme" on the issue. Portland pollster Tim Hibbitts said Kulongoski may have been quick to go on the attack because voters are increasingly looking for change and may be more likely to tie Kulongoski to Democrat Gov. John Kitzhaber and the budget stalemate in the Legislature. "This is a sign that the Kulongoski people aren't taking anything for granted," Hibbitts said. "This isn't a good time to be a front-runner, and people aren't happy with the way things are going." Kulongoski found himself on the receiving end of early attack ads when he first ran for governor 20 years ago. The state was in an even deeper recession then, and Kulongoski was running close to then-Gov. Vic Atiyeh in polls in the summer. In early September, Atiyeh launched radio ads saying that "this is no time for Mr. Kulongoski's dangerous approach" on the economy, and Atiyeh wound up winning in a landslide. Mannix also raised abortion as an issue during the primary when he sent out mailings pointing out that he was the only one of the Republican candidates who was "pro-life." And he attacked one of his primary rivals, Portland lawyer Ron Saxton, for not supporting a ban on the late-term procedure opponents call partial-birth abortion. Mannix began his general-election advertising last week with an ad focused on the economy and leadership. However, a separate group, Citizens for a Sound Economy, ran a TV commercial statewide criticizing Kulongoski for saying in the spring that the Legislature should enact a temporary income-tax increase to help fill the state's budget shortfall. Although the group says it is operating separately of Mannix, Grainger said she thinks the Citizens' ad is funded by people supporting the Republican candidate. "I disagree that we're the first" to use attack ads, she said. "I think Mannix and his supporters went negative two weeks ago." Russell Walker, who heads the Oregon chapter of Citizens for a Sound Economy, said the group spent more than $116,000 airing the ad for a week and planned to air it again soon. He said the ad was funded by local donors he did not name. But he said they were "not necessarily" Mannix supporters.

09/18/2002
Kulongoski Opens Ad Campaign on Abortion Issue
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Kulongoski Opens Ad Campaign on Abortion Issue

Ted Kulongoski launched his fall advertising campaign in the governor's race Tuesday with a withering attack on Republican Kevin Mannix's opposition to abortion. The front-runner dismissed accusations that he is trying to deflect attention from Oregon's economic crisis. Front-runners usually open their ad campaigns with a softer approach. But Kulongoski has been roughed up by an ad run by an independent group attacking his support for a tax increase, and his strategists think Mannix is vulnerable on abortion given Oregon's tradition of preserving abortion rights. Mannix spokesman Mike Beard said that Kulongoski is trying to shift the subject from more important issues. "Try telling the people with the pink slips right now that Ted Kulongoski's No. 1 concern is abortion," said Beard. Kulongoski spokeswoman Kristen Grainger made no apologies for focusing on abortion. "Kevin Mannix sees it as a red herring," she said. "We see it as a Great White that's going to bite him. . . . When he calls it a red herring, he's insulting the intelligence of the pro-choice voters of this state." Grainger said most of the TV time bought by the campaign would be devoted to the abortion ad, which claims Mannix is "too extreme" on the issue. Portland pollster Tim Hibbitts said Kulongoski may have been quick to go on the attack because voters are increasingly looking for change and may be more likely to tie Kulongoski to Democrat Gov. John Kitzhaber and the budget stalemate in the Legislature. He said people aren't happy with the way things are going. Kulongoski was on the receiving end of early attack ad when he first ran for governor 20 years ago. The state was in an even deeper recession then, and Kulongoski was running close to then-Gov. Vic Atiyeh in polls in the summer. In early September, Atiyeh launched radio ads saying that "this is no time for Mr. Kulongoski's dangerous approach" on the economy, and Atiyeh won in a landslide. Mannix also raised abortion as an issue during the primary when he sent out mailings pointing out that he was the only one of the Republican candidates who was "pro-life." Mannix began his general-election advertising last week with an ad focused on the economy and leadership. However, a separate group, Citizens for a Sound Economy, ran a TV commercial statewide criticizing Kulongoski for saying in the spring that the Legislature should enact a temporary income-tax increase to help fill the state's budget shortfall. Although the group says it is operating separately of Mannix, Grainger said she thinks the Citizens' ad is funded by people supporting him. "I disagree that we're the first" to use attack ads, she said. "I think Mannix and his supporters went negative two weeks ago." Russell Walker, who heads the Oregon chapter of Citizens for a Sound Economy, said the group spent more than $116,000 airing the ad for a week and that the ad was funded by local donors he did not name. But he said they were "not necessarily" Mannix supporters.

09/18/2002
Stand Down Mode
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Press Release

Stand Down Mode

The Republican staff director of the House Appropriations Committee announced on Monday that the House of Representatives was in a “stand down” mode. Congress is just over two weeks away from its scheduled final adjournment, and not one of the annual appropriations bills has been sent to the president. The Senate hasn’t even passed a budget resolution. And they are in a “stand down” mode?

09/17/2002
Global Warming’s Uncertain Future
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Press Release

Global Warming’s Uncertain Future

A recent report by the Environmental Protection Agency includes a notable departure from the last six years. The report, which provides an assessment of various pollutants, does not include any discussion of global warming, or global climate change. According to the New York Times, many environmentalists attribute the change to the administration’s close ties to industry, which has been opposed to moving forward with global warming policies, such as the Kyoto Protocol, which would force nations to make significant cutbacks in the use of fossil fuels.

09/17/2002
Decisions, Decisions
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Press Release

Decisions, Decisions

This Week – Both the House and Senate took Monday off for the observance of Yom Kippur. They expect to hit the ground running on Tuesday when the Senate resumes consideration of H.R. 5093, The Interior Appropriations Act. They will also continue to debate H.R. 5005, The Homeland Security Act, which the President has repeatedly asked for before the November elections. The House will consider legislation that would block states from restricting interest rates on rent-to-own transactions (H.R. 1701) and legislation to make the repeal of the estate tax permanent.

09/17/2002
I Want My SUV
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Press Release

I Want My SUV

“The effect of liberty to individuals is that they may do what they please; we ought to see what it will please them to do, before we risk congratulations which may be soon turned into complaints.” --Edmund Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France

09/17/2002
AIA Names New Political Director
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AIA Names New Political Director

BY Dennis Kelly

WASHINGTON (BestWire) - Joe Quigley, a veteran fund-raiser in Washington, D.C., over the past decade, is the American Insurance Association's new political director. Quigley will oversee AIA's political action committee and direct its political and grass-roots activity at the state and federal level, the AIA said. Quigley comes to the AIA from the National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts, where he was most recently director of government relations. His prior experience includes the development and implementation of nationwide fund-raising campaigns for the National Association of Realtors, Citizens for a Sound Economy and the National Republican Senatorial Committee. A Massachusetts native, Quigley is a graduate of the University of New Hampshire.

09/17/2002
Property Rights Violated......Rural America Under Siege
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Press Release

Property Rights Violated......Rural America Under Siege

Editor's note: The following is CSE member Madeleine Fortin's own story about how the federal government is confiscating her and her neighbors' property. CSE members from around the country and especially from Florida can support Madeleine Fortin and other Florida property owners by attending the Sawgrass Rebellion rallies in Naples and Homestead on October 17, 18, and 19. We will be sharing more information about these rallies in future CSE newsletters, as well as information about rallies across the country as convoys from Klamath Falls, OR, and London, OH travel to South Florida.

09/16/2002
New Jersey’s Day Of Reckoning Arrives As Nonrenewals Begin
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Press Release

New Jersey’s Day Of Reckoning Arrives As Nonrenewals Begin

State Farm Insurance will soon inform some New Jersey customers that they are among the 4,000 who will be non-renewed each month as part of the company’s five-year plan for withdrawing from what is clearly the nation’s worst auto insurance market. More than a year in the making, the nonrenewals will toss several hundred thousand policyholders into the marketplace in a steady stream that will exceed the capital capabilities of remaining insurers. With no new capital likely to enter the market, New Jersey should be girding itself for a full-fledged market crisis. Click here for the complete publication.

09/12/2002

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