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CSE Part of Link TV's Election Coverage
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Press Release

CSE Part of Link TV's Election Coverage

Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) activists have been invited by the producers of Link TV to participate in a series of one-hour, nationally televised interviews with each of the major candidates seeking the presidency in 2004, in a program called The People's Voice. Please visit Link TV to see the first interview with Rep. Dennis Kucinich:http://linktv.org/programming/programDescription.php4?code=election_kucinich

01/19/2004
No on Ballot Measure 30
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No on Ballot Measure 30

BY Russ Walker

Measure 30 provides Oregonians the chance to say no to the $1.1 billion tax package passed by the Legislature. More than 100,000 Oregonians signed petitions expressing their disapproval of the actions taken by legislators and a governor who has already gone back on his inaugural promise not to raise taxes. When ballots are counted Feb. 3, thousands more will echo this sentiment. Barely one year after the defeat of Measure 28, voters will again attempt to get a message across: Taxes are not the solution to Oregon's economic situation.

01/19/2004
The G.O.P, Inc.
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The G.O.P, Inc.

BY RICHARD W. BEHAN

The G.O.P. was once a respectable political party, giving voice to cautious citizens who saw much to protect in the affairs of the nation. The Democratic Party offered a forum for less sanguine citizens to disagree and seek reform, and in the healthy conflict between the two a robust democracy served the nation well. Neither party was rigidly ideological, driven passionately to impose a set of beliefs, as the Taliban, say, imposed Islam in prewar Afghanistan. Both parties respected democracy.

01/19/2004
Voters appear unfazed by cuts after last tax failed
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Voters appear unfazed by cuts after last tax failed

BY JEFF MAPES

When Oregon voters rejected an income tax increase a year ago, it had an undeniable impact on services. Nearly half the state's school districts ended the school year early. Some 8,000 poor Oregonians lost prescription drug coverage. Thousands of low-level criminals faced little or no prosecution for several months. But as a vote on yet another measure to increase taxes nears, the big lesson of the last year is that the threat -- and even the reality -- of cuts in services doesn't necessarily sway most voters.

01/19/2004
CUTS DON'T APPEAR TO SWAY MOST VOTERS
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CUTS DON'T APPEAR TO SWAY MOST VOTERS

BY JEFF MAPES

2nd of 2 parts Summary: School districts and local governments hustled to deal with less revenue as the Legislature struggled to provide more When Oregon voters rejected an income tax increase a year ago, it had an undeniable impact on services. Nearly half the state's school districts ended the school year early. Some 8,000 poor Oregonians lost prescription drug coverage. Thousands of low-level criminals faced little or no prosecution for several months.

01/19/2004
Measure 30 a taxing debate
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Measure 30 a taxing debate

BY STEVE LAW

TIMOTHY J. GONZALEZ /PHOTO Dean Braa, a sociology professor at Western Oregon University, fears that rising tuition costs will price some students out of a college education. He supports Measure 30, which would spare deep cuts to education. Statesman Journal January 18, 2004 Barbara Prince’s husband has cancer and their mom-and-pop truck repair shop is losing money. They would face $1,000 in higher business taxes under the Legislature’s 2003 tax-increase plan, so they are voting “no” on the Feb. 3 referendum to ratify the new taxes.

01/18/2004
Group looks beyond Measure 30
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Group looks beyond Measure 30

BY CARA ROBERTS MUREZ

Christine Ertl thinks Oregon treats its children abysmally. She wants better health care for children, more educational opportunities, safer neighborhoods and improved day care and after-school programs. As chairwoman of the Salem-Keizer chapter of Stand for Children, a citizen-based lobbying group, Ertl, the mother of two school-age children, gets passionate when she thinks about arguments that would limit funding for schools and services for children. She wants the trend to move in the other direction.

01/18/2004
Wealthy would bear brunt of tax plan
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Wealthy would bear brunt of tax plan

BY STEVE LAW

LORI CAIN / PHOTO Wayne Brady carves a wooden rocking horse at Walker Studio. Brady, who is retired and owns rental properties that will be affected by a tax increase, opposes Measure 30. “I think if we just keep on feeding (legislators), they’re just going to keep on spending,” he said. Statesman Journal January 18, 2004 At $1.2 billion, the state tax package on the Feb. 3 ballot amounts to one of the biggest tax increases in Oregon history.

01/18/2004
In Shady Cove, they know what they don’t want
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In Shady Cove, they know what they don’t want

BY DAMIAN MANN

PHOTO From left, Bob Sawyer, Larry Baines and Roger King belong to a Shady Cove group opposed to Measure 30. Baines says he’s skeptical whether the state Legislature will ever get the message that Oregonians don’t want more taxes. Mail Tribune / Bob Pennell Mail Tribune Roger King and his buddies share two things: a passion for fishing and a hatred of taxes. "We’re just a bunch of retired guys who hang out together, and sometimes travel together," said the 68-year-old Eagle Point man.

01/18/2004
Is Georgia Really Cutting Spending?
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Press Release

Is Georgia Really Cutting Spending?

Data recently released in the National Governors Association’s Fiscal Survey of States shows that Georgia’s budget for this year is set to increase spending despite increased revenue from additional taxes and fees levied on its citizens. In 2003, expenditures were estimated at just over $16.1 billion, but plans for 2004 have them increasing $177 million to nearly $16.3 billion. This is an increase in spending, despite rough economic times, additional federal bailout money, and roughly $400 million in tax and fee increases.

01/16/2004

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