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The Week Ahead
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The Week Ahead

EVENT: PANEL DISCUSSION - CITIZENS FOR A SOUND ECONOMY FOUNDATION SUBJECT: Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation holds a panel discussion "The Impact of the 2003 Tax Cut and a Look Ahead." LOCATION: 2325 Rayburn House Office Building -- June 10, 2003 PARTICIPANTS: John Berthoud, president, National Taxpayers Union; Daniel Mitchell, senior fellow, political economy, Heritage Foundation and Wayne Brough, chief economist, Citizens for a Sound Economy CONTACT: RSVP to Derek Lyons, 202-942-7659; e-mail, Dlyons@cse.org; http://www.cse.org

06/10/2003
Senators hear educators' pleas for tax increases Officials warn of few supplies, crowded classes, laid-off teachers
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Press Release

Senators hear educators' pleas for tax increases Officials warn of few supplies, crowded classes, laid-off teachers

Democratic Senate leaders trooped in school superintendents and college presidents to Raleigh Monday to help drive home their call for either cigarette and alcohol tax increases or a lottery to balance the state's lopsided budget for next year. Senate leaders also warned their colleagues to start planning ahead because the state's fiscal problems turn catastrophic in the budget for the following year, 2004-05.

06/10/2003
CSE Weighs in on North Carolina Budget Battle
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Press Release

CSE Weighs in on North Carolina Budget Battle

This article originally ran in the Winston-Salem Journal. EDUCATORS UPSET OVER CUTS; BUDGET REDUCTIONS WILL BE FELT IN THE CLASSROOMS, OFFICIALS SAY RALEIGH -- Education leaders told state senators yesterday that they can't handle more cuts in public education. Anti-tax activists told them that taxpayers can't handle more tax increases.

06/10/2003
Taxes Won't Increase in Texas, but Many Fees Will
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Press Release

Taxes Won't Increase in Texas, but Many Fees Will

Jun. 10--AUSTIN, Texas--Putting an exclamation point on a legislative session that opened with lawmakers facing a $9.9 billion shortfall, the all-Republican leadership team gave itself a pat on the back for not raising taxes. "State leaders showed the kind of budgetary discipline families must show: We set priorities, separated wants from needs and stretched every dollar," Gov. Rick Perry said a day after lawmakers finished their business. "We protected the pocketbooks of Texas taxpayers while protecting vital programs, increasing funding for public education and health care."

06/10/2003
What Next? The State of Fundamental Tax Reform
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Press Release

What Next? The State of Fundamental Tax Reform

The following is a generalized summary of the speeches presented at the CSE Policy Watch on Fundamental Tax Reform held in the Rayburn House Office Building on Tuesday, June 10, 2003. These notes were taken by Brandon Schwartz, Citizens for a Sound Economy, intern: Dr. Daniel Mitchell: McKenna Senior Fellow in Political Economy at the Heritage Foundation.

06/10/2003
Letter to Secretary John Snow
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Press Release

Letter to Secretary John Snow

The Honorable John Snow Secretary U.S. Treasury Department 1500 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Washington, D.C. 20220 Dear Secretary Snow: It was great to see you the other day, and thanks for asking for our input on the next steps for tax reform. We think you’re doing a great job, and we appreciate your leadership and hard work in support of meaningful tax relief for the American people.

06/10/2003
A Filibuster Without Precedent
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Press Release

A Filibuster Without Precedent

This op-ed originally ran in the Wall Street Journal on June 10, 2003.

06/10/2003
Texas Citizen Watchdog Groups Oppose Taxation Without Representation
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Press Release

Texas Citizen Watchdog Groups Oppose Taxation Without Representation

Among the almost 4,500 bills passed is one tax bill which is being opposed by citizen groups, including tax watchdog organizations Texas Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) and Texas Citizens Action Network (TexasCAN).

06/10/2003
CSE Opposes Senate Extension of the Child Tax Credit
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Press Release

CSE Opposes Senate Extension of the Child Tax Credit

Given the Senate’s action last week to expand the child tax credit, you might not realize that the 2003 Jobs and Growth Act completely eliminates federal income tax liability for three million taxpayers and dramatically expands the new ten percent income tax bracket for lower income earners.

06/10/2003
.C. Senate Democrats Sell Need for More Taxes
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.C. Senate Democrats Sell Need for More Taxes

BY Scott Mooneyham

Senate leaders continued their call Monday for additional taxes or lottery revenues to help balance the state budget, but saw a carefully scripted meeting undermined by anti-tax protesters. Senate Democrats had lined up a number of educators - including university system president Molly Broad and state community college system president Martin Lancaster - to speak about the destructive effects of more budget cuts at an afternoon meeting. But several dozen members of the anti-tax group Citizens for a Sound Economy greeted them, denouncing tax hikes and a lottery as unnecessary. "You have just about broken our backs," said Robin Stout, a CSE member from Orange County. "Please consider the taxpayers. We are watching." The Senate and House are locked in budget negotiations, with House leaders saying they have given as much as possible on the issue of taxes. The House and Senate have agreed to keep sales and income tax hikes adopted in 2001 as temporary measures in place for another two years. House budget negotiators have also agreed to a Senate proposal to make the sales taxes on soft drinks conform to the 4.5 percent for other nonfood items. Senate leaders, though, want additional revenue in the form of either alcohol or cigarette tax hikes, or a lottery. Despite a one-time federal infusion of $510 million, they say a weak economy and lower-than-expected tax collections means that projected revenue growth in a $15 billion state budget should be scaled back. Lower revenue projects, along with sluggish tax collections this year, means the state will have to plug a $600 million hole in the budget. House leaders look at the federal aid as largely fixing the budget problems for the next fiscal year, which begins July 1. Their plan does leave what is essentially a $200 million hole in the second year of the two-year budget by designating unspecified Medicaid savings. Sen. Tony Rand, D-Cumberland, said the state's taxpayers should be prepared for some unpopular budget cutting if they don't want to discuss additional steps to raise revenue. "I want to know what people think about cutting $600 million out of where we already stand," Rand said. "What, $360 million out of education. Is that OK?" Broad added that the university system, despite enrollment growth and money designated by lawmakers to meet it, has still seen its budget decline. "It is no longer achievable to protect the classroom with these budget cuts," Broad said. The House and Senate are trying to put together a budget deal before the July 1 start of the fiscal year. By doing so, the Legislature would prevent the 2001 tax hikes from expiring and eliminate the need to pass a separate revenue bill.

06/09/2003

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