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Democrats Say Bush Budget Hurts State Services

Roll Call (2/7, Duran) reports, "Democrats slammed President Bush's $2.23 trillion budget from a fresh angle Thursday, charging that it leaves states in the lurch. '[Bush's budget] fails to fund the president's own education reforms,' Senate Minority Leader Thomas Daschle (D-S.D.) said. 'It fails to help states struggling with rising Medicaid costs. In addition, it cuts children's health care, aid to local law enforcement, highway funding and environmental protection.'" States "face a collective $68.5 billion budget shortfall in fiscal 2004 -- the worst in 50 years, he said. 'When it comes to the way Congress deals with states' challenges, many Republicans preach the gospel of states' rights, but they practice policies that can be summed up in four words: "Pass on the pain,"' Daschle said." In particular, "Democrats have hammered the administration on its funding levels for education, arguing the president has not requested funding for his own No Child Left Behind Act." White House Would Get 9.3% Funding Boost Under Bush Plan. The Washington Post (2/7, A25, Milbank) reports, "While demanding that the federal government restrain its spending to a 4.1 percent increase in 2004, the Bush White House has assigned itself a more lenient standard: It has proposed a 9.3 percent increase in funding for the ongoing operations of the White House. Democrats say the administration is guilty of a do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do mentality." The White House "says various hidden security costs account for the increase. ... The only unit scheduled for a cut in funding is the White House Office of Policy Development." Group To Promote Bush Dividend Tax Cut. The Frontrunner (2/7) reports that in a news release distributed to political reporters, Tax Relief Coalition (TRC) members, The Business Roundtable (BRT) and Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE), announced they "will co-chair the TRC Committee for Dividend Benefits, a new task force being established by the Tax Relief Coalition to emphasize support for the proposal to eliminate the double taxation of dividends which is a key element of President Bush's Jobs and Growth initiative. At its first meeting in Washington today, the group agreed to launch a concerted campaign to promote the positive benefits to the American economy of the President's dividend proposal."

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Democrats Say Bush Budget Hurts State Services

Roll Call (2/7, Duran) reports, "Democrats slammed President Bush's $2.23 trillion budget from a fresh angle Thursday, charging that it leaves states in the lurch. '[Bush's budget] fails to fund the president's own education reforms,' Senate Minority Leader Thomas Daschle (D-S.D.) said. 'It fails to help states struggling with rising Medicaid costs. In addition, it cuts children's health care, aid to local law enforcement, highway funding and environmental protection.'" States "face a collective $68.5 billion budget shortfall in fiscal 2004 -- the worst in 50 years, he said. 'When it comes to the way Congress deals with states' challenges, many Republicans preach the gospel of states' rights, but they practice policies that can be summed up in four words: "Pass on the pain,"' Daschle said." In particular, "Democrats have hammered the administration on its funding levels for education, arguing the president has not requested funding for his own No Child Left Behind Act." White House Would Get 9.3% Funding Boost Under Bush Plan. The Washington Post (2/7, A25, Milbank) reports, "While demanding that the federal government restrain its spending to a 4.1 percent increase in 2004, the Bush White House has assigned itself a more lenient standard: It has proposed a 9.3 percent increase in funding for the ongoing operations of the White House. Democrats say the administration is guilty of a do-as-I-say-not-as-I-do mentality." The White House "says various hidden security costs account for the increase. ... The only unit scheduled for a cut in funding is the White House Office of Policy Development." Group To Promote Bush Dividend Tax Cut. The Frontrunner (2/7) reports that in a news release distributed to political reporters, Tax Relief Coalition (TRC) members, The Business Roundtable (BRT) and Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE), announced they "will co-chair the TRC Committee for Dividend Benefits, a new task force being established by the Tax Relief Coalition to emphasize support for the proposal to eliminate the double taxation of dividends which is a key element of President Bush's Jobs and Growth initiative. At its first meeting in Washington today, the group agreed to launch a concerted campaign to promote the positive benefits to the American economy of the President's dividend proposal."

02/07/2003
Voters Reject Measure 28, Legislators Hope To Delay Cuts

The Salem Statesman Journal (1/29, Law) reports, "Oregon voters soundly defeated a three-year income and corporate tax increase Tuesday, triggering state trooper layoffs and immediate cuts to public schools, colleges and senior and disabled services." The Statesman Journal continues, "'Measure 28 was a short-term fix to a long-term problem,' said Gov. Ted Kulongoski, a Democrat. 'We need to face up to the fact that Oregon is in a recession and our tax structure is such that when the economy takes a downturn, state services take a hit.'" The Statesman Journal adds, "The immediate cuts take place Saturday, under a law passed by the Legislature when it placed Measure 28 on the ballot. ... However, House leaders hope to persuade the Senate and Kulongoski to delay the cuts awhile. They hope to forge a quick agreement to prevent what they call 'lethal cuts.'" The Statesman Journal notes, "Russ Walker, Northwest director of Citizens for a Sound Economy, who opposed Measure 28, said it's time for the Legislature to reprioritize spending. His group wants the state to slash economic development, eliminate the Oregon Cultural Trust and privatize the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, among other ideas."

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Voters Reject Measure 28, Legislators Hope To Delay Cuts

The Salem Statesman Journal (1/29, Law) reports, "Oregon voters soundly defeated a three-year income and corporate tax increase Tuesday, triggering state trooper layoffs and immediate cuts to public schools, colleges and senior and disabled services." The Statesman Journal continues, "'Measure 28 was a short-term fix to a long-term problem,' said Gov. Ted Kulongoski, a Democrat. 'We need to face up to the fact that Oregon is in a recession and our tax structure is such that when the economy takes a downturn, state services take a hit.'" The Statesman Journal adds, "The immediate cuts take place Saturday, under a law passed by the Legislature when it placed Measure 28 on the ballot. ... However, House leaders hope to persuade the Senate and Kulongoski to delay the cuts awhile. They hope to forge a quick agreement to prevent what they call 'lethal cuts.'" The Statesman Journal notes, "Russ Walker, Northwest director of Citizens for a Sound Economy, who opposed Measure 28, said it's time for the Legislature to reprioritize spending. His group wants the state to slash economic development, eliminate the Oregon Cultural Trust and privatize the Oregon Liquor Control Commission, among other ideas."

01/29/2003
Pro-Tax Increase Forces Appear To Have Momentum

The Salem Statesman Journal (1/22, Law) reports, "With only one week to go in the election, momentum clearly has shifted to supporters, who have raised far more dollars and mobilized countless more volunteers." The Statesman Journal continues, "Opponents apparently were caught flat-footed by the sudden surge of voter support after most political analysts dismissed the measure's chances of passage. . Supporters aren't going to be complacent about the opposition's weak fund raising, insisted Patty Wentz, Yes on 28 spokeswoman. She expects opponents could get a quick money injection from conservative Aloha businessman Loren Parks or the national Citizens for a Sound Economy."

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Pro-Tax Increase Forces Appear To Have Momentum

The Salem Statesman Journal (1/22, Law) reports, "With only one week to go in the election, momentum clearly has shifted to supporters, who have raised far more dollars and mobilized countless more volunteers." The Statesman Journal continues, "Opponents apparently were caught flat-footed by the sudden surge of voter support after most political analysts dismissed the measure's chances of passage. . Supporters aren't going to be complacent about the opposition's weak fund raising, insisted Patty Wentz, Yes on 28 spokeswoman. She expects opponents could get a quick money injection from conservative Aloha businessman Loren Parks or the national Citizens for a Sound Economy."

01/22/2003
Texas Textbook Debate Has National Implications

NBC (7/25, story 5, Brokaw) reports, "In the midst of summer vacation when kids are taking a break from textbooks, a battle over those books is at a boiling point now in Texas. At issue, whether the books slant the truth. And the outcome could affect what your kids end up reading come homework time." NBC (Tibbles) adds, "What you're watching is a debate over what high school students in Texas should be reading in school." For "years, conservative groups have complained many books contain a liberal slant." Chris Patterson of Texas Public Policy Foundation was shown saying, "There is still the political correctness and the whitewashing and the bleaching of our history that needs to be addressed." NBC adds, "What kinds of things do they want changed? According to the foundation, one high school history book says - 'The Kennedy brothers played key roles in the civil rights movement.' The criticism - 'This is excessive, as they spent as much time frustrating it as helping.' Another example? 'Tourists and fur traders shot buffalo for sport.' The criticism - 'Once equipped with repeating weapons, plains Indians overhunted and engaged in hunting for the sport of it as well.' So, why is this important in the $4.5 billion textbook industry? Because Texas is the second largest buyer in the country. So whatever books the Texas school board approves, will likely wind up being used in classrooms from Alaska to Arkansas. But critics of these groups charge them with hijacking the text in the textbooks." Samantha Smoot of the Texas Freedom Network was shown saying, "What the right wing would like to do when it comes to history textbooks is essentially stop the clock at 1950." NBC adds, "Dr. Dan Chiras had his advanced science textbook rejected because it stated, among other things, that 'over 100 million Americans are breathing unhealthy air.' The Texas public policy foundation called that an exaggeration, misleading and 'shocking vitriol against Western civilization.'" Chiras was shown saying, "Even though the opposing viewpoints were often presented as well, they disagreed with those, and then went on a witch hunt to find -- basically burn this book at the stake." NBC adds, "The Foundation also succeeded in having this line removed from another altogether. 'Most experts on global warming feel that immediate action should be taken to curb global warming.' But these groups say all they want is for kids to get the best education possible." Peggy Venable of Texas Citizens for a Sound Economy was shown saying, "Isn't it ludicrous that when parents and citizens get involved, review textbooks and testify on concerns they have, that a group wants to call it censorship?" NBC adds, "A heated debate that raises the question -- how much influence should politics have in the education of millions of American children?"

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Texas Textbook Debate Has National Implications

NBC (7/25, story 5, Brokaw) reports, "In the midst of summer vacation when kids are taking a break from textbooks, a battle over those books is at a boiling point now in Texas. At issue, whether the books slant the truth. And the outcome could affect what your kids end up reading come homework time." NBC (Tibbles) adds, "What you're watching is a debate over what high school students in Texas should be reading in school." For "years, conservative groups have complained many books contain a liberal slant." Chris Patterson of Texas Public Policy Foundation was shown saying, "There is still the political correctness and the whitewashing and the bleaching of our history that needs to be addressed." NBC adds, "What kinds of things do they want changed? According to the foundation, one high school history book says - 'The Kennedy brothers played key roles in the civil rights movement.' The criticism - 'This is excessive, as they spent as much time frustrating it as helping.' Another example? 'Tourists and fur traders shot buffalo for sport.' The criticism - 'Once equipped with repeating weapons, plains Indians overhunted and engaged in hunting for the sport of it as well.' So, why is this important in the $4.5 billion textbook industry? Because Texas is the second largest buyer in the country. So whatever books the Texas school board approves, will likely wind up being used in classrooms from Alaska to Arkansas. But critics of these groups charge them with hijacking the text in the textbooks." Samantha Smoot of the Texas Freedom Network was shown saying, "What the right wing would like to do when it comes to history textbooks is essentially stop the clock at 1950." NBC adds, "Dr. Dan Chiras had his advanced science textbook rejected because it stated, among other things, that 'over 100 million Americans are breathing unhealthy air.' The Texas public policy foundation called that an exaggeration, misleading and 'shocking vitriol against Western civilization.'" Chiras was shown saying, "Even though the opposing viewpoints were often presented as well, they disagreed with those, and then went on a witch hunt to find -- basically burn this book at the stake." NBC adds, "The Foundation also succeeded in having this line removed from another altogether. 'Most experts on global warming feel that immediate action should be taken to curb global warming.' But these groups say all they want is for kids to get the best education possible." Peggy Venable of Texas Citizens for a Sound Economy was shown saying, "Isn't it ludicrous that when parents and citizens get involved, review textbooks and testify on concerns they have, that a group wants to call it censorship?" NBC adds, "A heated debate that raises the question -- how much influence should politics have in the education of millions of American children?"

07/26/2002
Confirmation Of Smith May Herald End Of Judicial Nominee Gridlock

The Washington Times (7/16, Hudson) reports, "The gridlock over President Bush's judicial nominees eased yesterday with the confirmation of Judge Lavenski R. Smith to the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, the first action growing from a deal struck last week between Republicans and Democrats. Judge Smith of Arkansas was confirmed by the Senate on a voice vote, after senators backed a measure to vote on his confirmation by a 94-3 margin. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, South Dakota Democrat, tentatively agreed to hold votes on judges in exchange for Senate Minority Leader Trent Lott, Mississippi Republican, releasing his hold on the nomination of Jonathan Adelstein, an aide to Mr. Daschle, for the Federal Communications Commission. . However, the objections of Sen. John McCain over a particular nominee are forcing Republicans and Democrats to proceed at a snail's pace to confirm 70 stalled candidates. . While Judge Smith was confirmed without conflict, the nomination of Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla R. Owen to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court came under fire yesterday. Her first committee hearing is set for Thursday. . Liberal special interest groups held a press conference criticizing the nominee, immediately followed by conservative groups defending her as a fair and qualified candidate. . The groups, which include the National Organization for Women, the AFL-CIO and Planned Parenthood, want Democrats to reject the nomination." Coalition Decries Liberal Groups' Criticism of Owen. The Houston Chronicle/AP (7/16) reports, "The U.S. Senate should not allow any 'left-wing activist groups to hijack' the confirmation process of Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla Owen, President Bush's nominee for a federal appeals court, several groups said Monday. 'She's just, very simply, an excellent, an extremely well-qualified and a very liked judge,' said Kelly Shackelford, chief counsel of Liberty Legal Institute, which says it specializes in the defense of religious freedoms and First Amendment rights. . Bush has nominated Owen for the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans, which decides appeals from federal courts in Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi. A hearing before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled for Thursday. Shackelford made his comments Monday as his and other groups pledged their support for Owen after a coalition of labor, consumer and women's rights groups last week labeled Owen an 'ultraconservative activist' who opposes consumer and reproductive rights. The groups last week pledged to battle Owen's confirmation. . Among the groups Monday that held the news conference in support of Owen's nomination were the Texas Justice Foundation, Free Market Foundation, Liberty Legal Institute, the Texas chapter of Concerned Women for America, Texas Eagle Forum, the Texas Home School Coalition, the Texas Christian Coalition, the Young Conservatives of Texas and Texas Citizens for a Sound Economy."

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Confirmation Of Smith May Herald End Of Judicial Nominee Gridlock

The Washington Times (7/16, Hudson) reports, "The gridlock over President Bush's judicial nominees eased yesterday with the confirmation of Judge Lavenski R. Smith to the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, the first action growing from a deal struck last week between Republicans and Democrats. Judge Smith of Arkansas was confirmed by the Senate on a voice vote, after senators backed a measure to vote on his confirmation by a 94-3 margin. Senate Majority Leader Tom Daschle, South Dakota Democrat, tentatively agreed to hold votes on judges in exchange for Senate Minority Leader Trent Lott, Mississippi Republican, releasing his hold on the nomination of Jonathan Adelstein, an aide to Mr. Daschle, for the Federal Communications Commission. . However, the objections of Sen. John McCain over a particular nominee are forcing Republicans and Democrats to proceed at a snail's pace to confirm 70 stalled candidates. . While Judge Smith was confirmed without conflict, the nomination of Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla R. Owen to the 5th U.S. Circuit Court came under fire yesterday. Her first committee hearing is set for Thursday. . Liberal special interest groups held a press conference criticizing the nominee, immediately followed by conservative groups defending her as a fair and qualified candidate. . The groups, which include the National Organization for Women, the AFL-CIO and Planned Parenthood, want Democrats to reject the nomination." Coalition Decries Liberal Groups' Criticism of Owen. The Houston Chronicle/AP (7/16) reports, "The U.S. Senate should not allow any 'left-wing activist groups to hijack' the confirmation process of Texas Supreme Court Justice Priscilla Owen, President Bush's nominee for a federal appeals court, several groups said Monday. 'She's just, very simply, an excellent, an extremely well-qualified and a very liked judge,' said Kelly Shackelford, chief counsel of Liberty Legal Institute, which says it specializes in the defense of religious freedoms and First Amendment rights. . Bush has nominated Owen for the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans, which decides appeals from federal courts in Texas, Louisiana and Mississippi. A hearing before the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled for Thursday. Shackelford made his comments Monday as his and other groups pledged their support for Owen after a coalition of labor, consumer and women's rights groups last week labeled Owen an 'ultraconservative activist' who opposes consumer and reproductive rights. The groups last week pledged to battle Owen's confirmation. . Among the groups Monday that held the news conference in support of Owen's nomination were the Texas Justice Foundation, Free Market Foundation, Liberty Legal Institute, the Texas chapter of Concerned Women for America, Texas Eagle Forum, the Texas Home School Coalition, the Texas Christian Coalition, the Young Conservatives of Texas and Texas Citizens for a Sound Economy."

07/16/2002
IA: Ganske Joining Bush To Promote Repeal Of Estate Tax

The Des Moines Register (6/7, Norman) reports, "President Bush arrives in Des Moines today to promote the permanent repeal of the estate tax as a boon for farmers, but Democrats insist the repeal is nothing more than a sop for the super-rich. Bush will be accompanied to Iowa on Air Force One by Rep. Greg Ganske, who advocates a rollback of the tax. His Democratic opponent in this fall's Senate election, incumbent Sen. Tom Harkin, does not. Harkin is expected to show up for the president's remarks at the World Pork Expo at the Iowa State Fairgrounds, where Harkin has a booth. However, Harkin aides said Thursday night that White House officials told Harkin he could not appear with the President because he did not vote for the tax cut. White House officials confirmed that Harkin was not invited. 'Sen. Harkin didn't support tax relief for hard- working Iowa families,' said Scott Stanzel, a White House spokesman. Harkin aides questioned how Bush could refuse to invite Democrats to a nonpartisan event paid for with tax money. White House officials said they invited members of Congress who backed Bush on tax relief." Harkin "said Thursday he would support a higher exemption for estates to benefit farms or closely held businesses but not a total repeal."

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IA: Ganske Joining Bush To Promote Repeal Of Estate Tax

The Des Moines Register (6/7, Norman) reports, "President Bush arrives in Des Moines today to promote the permanent repeal of the estate tax as a boon for farmers, but Democrats insist the repeal is nothing more than a sop for the super-rich. Bush will be accompanied to Iowa on Air Force One by Rep. Greg Ganske, who advocates a rollback of the tax. His Democratic opponent in this fall's Senate election, incumbent Sen. Tom Harkin, does not. Harkin is expected to show up for the president's remarks at the World Pork Expo at the Iowa State Fairgrounds, where Harkin has a booth. However, Harkin aides said Thursday night that White House officials told Harkin he could not appear with the President because he did not vote for the tax cut. White House officials confirmed that Harkin was not invited. 'Sen. Harkin didn't support tax relief for hard- working Iowa families,' said Scott Stanzel, a White House spokesman. Harkin aides questioned how Bush could refuse to invite Democrats to a nonpartisan event paid for with tax money. White House officials said they invited members of Congress who backed Bush on tax relief." Harkin "said Thursday he would support a higher exemption for estates to benefit farms or closely held businesses but not a total repeal."

07/07/2002
House Votes To Permanently Repeal Marriage Tax

CBS (6/13, story 7, Rather) reports, "In Congress, the House voted for permanent repeal of the so-called marriage tax. Prospects for final passage in the Senate are iffy at best. Opponents of repeal say Social Security trust funds would be drained to make up for the lost marriage tax money."

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House Votes To Permanently Repeal Marriage Tax

CBS (6/13, story 7, Rather) reports, "In Congress, the House voted for permanent repeal of the so-called marriage tax. Prospects for final passage in the Senate are iffy at best. Opponents of repeal say Social Security trust funds would be drained to make up for the lost marriage tax money."

06/14/2002
NH: Normand May Join Democratic Primary

The Manchester Union Leader (7/29, DiStaso) reported, "On your scorecard of possible candidates for governor in 2002, pencil in a third Democrat." Manchester attorney James Normand, a "former state executive councilor, confirmed yesterday that he is 'looking very seriously' at running for governor next year in case Gov. Jeanne Shaheen decides not to seek a fourth term. He joins state Sens. Beverly Hollingworth of Hampton and Mark Fernald of Sharon on the current Democratic list of those actively eyeing the corner office." Republicans Gordon Humphrey, Craig Benson and Bruce Keough "are moving quickly toward candidacies." Keough "yesterday announced that New Hampshire Citizens for a Sound Economy's Rich Killion has been named executive director of his exploratory committee." Normand is "viewed as a moderate who would could give Democratic primary voters an alternative to two more liberal income tax advocates."

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NH: Normand May Join Democratic Primary

The Manchester Union Leader (7/29, DiStaso) reported, "On your scorecard of possible candidates for governor in 2002, pencil in a third Democrat." Manchester attorney James Normand, a "former state executive councilor, confirmed yesterday that he is 'looking very seriously' at running for governor next year in case Gov. Jeanne Shaheen decides not to seek a fourth term. He joins state Sens. Beverly Hollingworth of Hampton and Mark Fernald of Sharon on the current Democratic list of those actively eyeing the corner office." Republicans Gordon Humphrey, Craig Benson and Bruce Keough "are moving quickly toward candidacies." Keough "yesterday announced that New Hampshire Citizens for a Sound Economy's Rich Killion has been named executive director of his exploratory committee." Normand is "viewed as a moderate who would could give Democratic primary voters an alternative to two more liberal income tax advocates."

07/30/2001
Today's Events In Washington

White House:

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Today's Events In Washington

White House:

04/16/2001
Today's Events In Washington

White House: PRESIDENT BUSH - Travels to St. Louis, Mo.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Washington, D.C. for school events. VICE PRESIDENT CHENEY - Unavailable. US Senate: Not in session. US House: Not in session. Other: NUCLEAR _ 9:15 a.m.-5 p.m. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) holds a fourth and final meeting of nuclear experts from the government, the nuclear industry, academia and the public to review, discuss and propose individual recommendations on the role and future direction of regulatory research for commission consideration. It also discusses questions posed to the panel by NRC Chairman Richard Meserve. Location: Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), 1800 K St. NW. MICROSOFT _ 9 a.m. The Washington Legal Foundation hosts a media briefing, ' 'Microsoft on Appeal: The End of the Road or a New Beginning for Antitrust Law?' ' with Ernest Gellhorn, George Mason University; Irwin Stelzer, Hudson Institute; and Lars Liebeler, Thaler Liebeler Machado & Rasmussen. Location: M.J. Murdock Center for Free Enterprise, Washington Legal Foundation, 2009 Massachusetts Ave. NW. PHYSICIAN-PATIENT _ 9 a.m. The American College of Physicians and American Society of Internal Medicine host a breakfast briefing on reducing government and insurer intrusions into the physician-patient relationship, with Dr. Sandra Adamson Fryhofer, ACP-ASIM president; and Robert Doherty and John Dumoulin of ACP-ASIM. Location: National Press Club, Lisagor Room. ENERGY _ 9:30 a.m. Members of the United States Energy Association hold a briefing on USEA National Energy Strategy, releasing a paper outlining several areas of action to enhance energy supplies, encourage energy efficiency and affordable prices, stimulate global energy trade and development, and others, with Red Cavaney, CEO, American Petroleum Institute; John Derrick, CEO, Pepco, and chairman of the USEA Board of Directors; Glenn English, National Rural Electric Cooperative Assn.; Jack Gerard, CEO, National Mining Assn.; Angie Howard, Nuclear Energy Institute; Dick Lawson, chairman, USEA National Energy Policy Committee; David Owens, vice president, Edison Electric Institute; David Parker, CEO, American Gas Assn.; and Allen Richardson, president, American Public Power Assn. Location: National Press Club, Zenger Room. TEEN DRUG SURVEY _ 10 a.m. Joseph Califano, Jr., president of The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASA) and former U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, releases CASA's 6th annual teen drug survey. He is joined by Mayor Brent Coles of Boise, Idaho, president, U.S. Conference of Mayors, and Mayor Scott King of Gary, Ind. Coles and King chair the Conference's Drug Control Task Force. Location: National Press Club, Murrow Room. FINANCIAL MARKETS _ Noon. Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation hosts a Policy Watch luncheon discussion, ''Who Let the Bears Out? Perspectives on a New SEC and the Fate of Financial Markets,'' with Laura Unger, acting chairwoman, SEC; Jerry Ellig, Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation; Matt Andresen, CEO, Island ECN; and Gregory Smith, JP Morgan H & Q. Location: Room 2222, Rayburn House Office Building. MICROSOFT _ Noon-2 p.m. The Progress & Freedom Foundation hosts a panel discussion on ''Is Microsoft Still a Monopoly?'' with Jeffrey Eisenach and Thomas Lenard, Progress & Freedom Foundation; Edward Black, Computer & Communications Industry Association; Robert Litan, Brookings Institution; and Kenneth Starr, Kirkland & Ellis. Location: National Press Club, First Amendment Room. BUSH-ECONOMIC POLICY _ 3:15 p.m. White House assistant Lawrence Lindsey speaks on the Bush administration economic policy. Foreign media only. Location: Foreign Press Center, National Press Building. DELLUMS _ 7 p.m. Former Rep. Ron Dellums discusses his congressional career. Location: Nineteenth Street Baptist Church, 4606 16th St. NW. THE REST OF WASHINGTON _ 7:30 p.m. American University 's School of Communication presents An American Forum, ''Between the White House & the Hill: Reporting on the Rest of Washington,'' with panelists Charles Lewis, president, Center for Public Integrity; Elizabeth Marchak, Cleveland Plain Dealer; Timothy Noah, Slate magazine; Charles Peters, editor-in-chief, Washington Monthly; and moderator Wendell Cochran, American University. Location: American University, Kay Spiritual Life Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW.

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Today's Events In Washington

White House: PRESIDENT BUSH - Travels to St. Louis, Mo.; Knoxville, Tenn.; and Washington, D.C. for school events. VICE PRESIDENT CHENEY - Unavailable. US Senate: Not in session. US House: Not in session. Other: NUCLEAR _ 9:15 a.m.-5 p.m. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) holds a fourth and final meeting of nuclear experts from the government, the nuclear industry, academia and the public to review, discuss and propose individual recommendations on the role and future direction of regulatory research for commission consideration. It also discusses questions posed to the panel by NRC Chairman Richard Meserve. Location: Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS), 1800 K St. NW. MICROSOFT _ 9 a.m. The Washington Legal Foundation hosts a media briefing, ' 'Microsoft on Appeal: The End of the Road or a New Beginning for Antitrust Law?' ' with Ernest Gellhorn, George Mason University; Irwin Stelzer, Hudson Institute; and Lars Liebeler, Thaler Liebeler Machado & Rasmussen. Location: M.J. Murdock Center for Free Enterprise, Washington Legal Foundation, 2009 Massachusetts Ave. NW. PHYSICIAN-PATIENT _ 9 a.m. The American College of Physicians and American Society of Internal Medicine host a breakfast briefing on reducing government and insurer intrusions into the physician-patient relationship, with Dr. Sandra Adamson Fryhofer, ACP-ASIM president; and Robert Doherty and John Dumoulin of ACP-ASIM. Location: National Press Club, Lisagor Room. ENERGY _ 9:30 a.m. Members of the United States Energy Association hold a briefing on USEA National Energy Strategy, releasing a paper outlining several areas of action to enhance energy supplies, encourage energy efficiency and affordable prices, stimulate global energy trade and development, and others, with Red Cavaney, CEO, American Petroleum Institute; John Derrick, CEO, Pepco, and chairman of the USEA Board of Directors; Glenn English, National Rural Electric Cooperative Assn.; Jack Gerard, CEO, National Mining Assn.; Angie Howard, Nuclear Energy Institute; Dick Lawson, chairman, USEA National Energy Policy Committee; David Owens, vice president, Edison Electric Institute; David Parker, CEO, American Gas Assn.; and Allen Richardson, president, American Public Power Assn. Location: National Press Club, Zenger Room. TEEN DRUG SURVEY _ 10 a.m. Joseph Califano, Jr., president of The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASA) and former U.S. Secretary of Health, Education and Welfare, releases CASA's 6th annual teen drug survey. He is joined by Mayor Brent Coles of Boise, Idaho, president, U.S. Conference of Mayors, and Mayor Scott King of Gary, Ind. Coles and King chair the Conference's Drug Control Task Force. Location: National Press Club, Murrow Room. FINANCIAL MARKETS _ Noon. Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation hosts a Policy Watch luncheon discussion, ''Who Let the Bears Out? Perspectives on a New SEC and the Fate of Financial Markets,'' with Laura Unger, acting chairwoman, SEC; Jerry Ellig, Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation; Matt Andresen, CEO, Island ECN; and Gregory Smith, JP Morgan H & Q. Location: Room 2222, Rayburn House Office Building. MICROSOFT _ Noon-2 p.m. The Progress & Freedom Foundation hosts a panel discussion on ''Is Microsoft Still a Monopoly?'' with Jeffrey Eisenach and Thomas Lenard, Progress & Freedom Foundation; Edward Black, Computer & Communications Industry Association; Robert Litan, Brookings Institution; and Kenneth Starr, Kirkland & Ellis. Location: National Press Club, First Amendment Room. BUSH-ECONOMIC POLICY _ 3:15 p.m. White House assistant Lawrence Lindsey speaks on the Bush administration economic policy. Foreign media only. Location: Foreign Press Center, National Press Building. DELLUMS _ 7 p.m. Former Rep. Ron Dellums discusses his congressional career. Location: Nineteenth Street Baptist Church, 4606 16th St. NW. THE REST OF WASHINGTON _ 7:30 p.m. American University 's School of Communication presents An American Forum, ''Between the White House & the Hill: Reporting on the Rest of Washington,'' with panelists Charles Lewis, president, Center for Public Integrity; Elizabeth Marchak, Cleveland Plain Dealer; Timothy Noah, Slate magazine; Charles Peters, editor-in-chief, Washington Monthly; and moderator Wendell Cochran, American University. Location: American University, Kay Spiritual Life Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW.

04/16/2001

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