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Tug of war brewing over streamlined sales taxes

Drive to the furniture store. Check out some sofas in Grapevine. Slap down a credit card, and ship the sofa to your Hurst home. Which city gets the sales tax? Right now, it's Grapevine. But a new sales tax model gaining momentum would shift the revenue to the community where an item is delivered. It's called streamlined sales tax, and states see it as a way to capture revenue lost to online sales, a growing retail segment. Some local governments and consumers are wary.

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Tug of war brewing over streamlined sales taxes

BY Ellena F. Morrison

Drive to the furniture store. Check out some sofas in Grapevine. Slap down a credit card, and ship the sofa to your Hurst home. Which city gets the sales tax? Right now, it's Grapevine. But a new sales tax model gaining momentum would shift the revenue to the community where an item is delivered. It's called streamlined sales tax, and states see it as a way to capture revenue lost to online sales, a growing retail segment. Some local governments and consumers are wary.

08/22/2004
Officials seek to regulate construction emmissions

Posted on Sun, Oct. 05, 2003 At a construction site in north Fort Worth, where they're building an Eckerd Drugs, black smoke bellows from a huge excavator as it strains to lift a concrete block. Across the street, where construction crews are preparing to build a Walgreens drugstore, road graders noisily plow the dirt as plumes of exhaust trail them like shadows. It's a scene played out daily across the Metroplex, where unbridled growth has unleashed one of the largest sources of air pollution in the region: diesel-powered construction equipment.

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Officials seek to regulate construction emmissions

BY Scott Streater

Posted on Sun, Oct. 05, 2003 At a construction site in north Fort Worth, where they're building an Eckerd Drugs, black smoke bellows from a huge excavator as it strains to lift a concrete block. Across the street, where construction crews are preparing to build a Walgreens drugstore, road graders noisily plow the dirt as plumes of exhaust trail them like shadows. It's a scene played out daily across the Metroplex, where unbridled growth has unleashed one of the largest sources of air pollution in the region: diesel-powered construction equipment.

10/05/2003