Contact FreedomWorks

400 North Capitol Street, NW
Suite 765
Washington, DC 20001

  • Toll Free 1.888.564.6273
  • Local 202.783.3870
What's next for Oregon?
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

What's next for Oregon?

BY PETER WONG AND STEVE LAW

PHOTO Gov. Ted Kulongoski helped lead efforts in support of Measure 30. The measure’s defeat forces Kulongoski and other lawmakers to stretch government dollars. February 8, 2004 So, Oregon voters killed a major tax increase last week? What else is new? They turned down sales taxes nine out of nine chances since that idea first made the ballot in 1933. They rejected higher income taxes 15 times out of 17 since 1912 and haven’t approved one since 1930, when a proposal squeaked through that also lowered property taxes.

02/08/2004
Voters trounce Measure 30
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Voters trounce Measure 30

BY STEVE LAW

PHOTO/TIMOTHY J. GONZALEZ Russ Walker (center), chief petitioner for Measure 30, and Angela Wilhelms (right), campaign manager, react to the first vote tally on the income tax measure Tuesday in Wilsonville. Measure 30 was rejected by Oregon voters in the vote by mail election. Voters sent a clear message to lawmakers Tuesday: Lower our taxes. Oregonians easily overturned the state Legislature’s $1.2 billion tax increase, rejecting the tax referendum by a 3-to-2 margin.

02/04/2004
Vote turnout hasn’t measured up
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Vote turnout hasn’t measured up

BY STEVE LAW

Voter turnout for the Measure 30 tax increase is down compared to a similar election a year ago, but public employee-rich Marion County has the heaviest turnout in the state. Not counting late votes arriving Monday and today, 48 percent of Oregon’s registered voters have cast ballots on the $1.2 billion tax package. This time a year ago, 53 percent of registered voters — or 100,000 more people — had cast ballots on the smaller tax increase known as Measure 28.

02/03/2004
Businesses’ tax burden draws sharp arguments
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Businesses’ tax burden draws sharp arguments

BY STEVE LAW

Critics of Measure 30 say the $1.2 billion tax package on the Feb. 3 ballot may be the worst thing that could happen to Oregon’s sagging economy and business climate. They blame Oregon’s taxes for a litany of ills: the state’s high jobless rate, the recent flight of corporate headquarters and the departure of manufacturers such as SUMCO Oregon. Measure 30 will “throw sand in Oregon’s economic engine” and keep driving businesses away, said Russ Walker, who is leading the opposition campaign as Northwest director of Citizens for a Sound Economy.

01/31/2004
Understanding Oregon’s Measure 30
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Understanding Oregon’s Measure 30

BY SARAH EVANS

Oregon voters soon will decide on Measure 30, a proposal to temporarily raise income taxes. When the Oregon Legislature met in 2003, it was faced with a difficult problem — how do we pay for everything the state needs when we don’t have enough money? It’s like if you want to buy a $15 CD and spend $5 on soda, but your allowance for the week is only $15. Do you ask your parents for more money? Or do you cut back on soda so you can get the CD? The legislators’ solution was Measure 30. What does Measure 30 do?

01/30/2004
Cities weigh Measure 30’s local impact
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Cities weigh Measure 30’s local impact

BY DENNIS THOMPSON JR., CRYSTAL BOLNER AND SHAWN DAY

Cities in Marion and Polk county don’t expect to see budget cuts if Measure 30’s $1.2 billion state tax increase fails to get voter approval next Tuesday — at least not in the short term. But a number of city leaders say they expect to see immediate, indirect consequences if the state slashes its budget, much of it affecting public safety and quality of life.

01/28/2004
Measure 30: Don’t discourage businesses
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Measure 30: Don’t discourage businesses

BY RUSS WALKER

In what is becoming an annual event, voters have received ballots asking them for higher taxes — this year, it’s Measure 30’s $1.1 billion tax hike. The hike will hit everyone — families, businesses, property owners, even senior citizens. It will cause long-term damage to the economic health of the state and do nothing to aid economic recovery. To paraphrase Winston Churchill, a state trying to tax itself into prosperity is like a man standing in a bucket and trying to lift himself up by the handle.

01/28/2004
Donors continue to give to Measure 30 campaigns
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Donors continue to give to Measure 30 campaigns

BY STEVE LAW

The main coalition supporting the Measure 30 tax increase on Oregon’s Feb. 3 ballot raised $167,657 last week, while the group leading the opposition raised about $31,000. Yes on 30 received hefty donations from unions representing teachers and local and state government workers, plus some smaller checks from businesses and other groups. Citizens for a Sound Economy, which is spearheading opposition to the $1.2 billion tax increase, received one large check from A-Dec, a Newberg dental equipment company.

01/27/2004
College officials ponder further tuition increases
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

College officials ponder further tuition increases

BY TARA MCLAIN

Leaders of local colleges say a “no” vote on Measure 30 may guarantee tuition increases for students next fall.

01/27/2004
Donors continue to give to Measure 30 campaigns
null
http://d7.freedomworks.org.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/thumbnail/s3/te_social_media_share/fw_default_0.jpg?itok=mX_C44GW

Donors continue to give to Measure 30 campaigns

BY STEVE LAW

The main coalition supporting the Measure 30 tax increase on Oregon’s Feb. 3 ballot raised $167,657 last week, while the group leading the opposition raised about $31,000. Yes on 30 received hefty donations from unions representing teachers and local and state government workers, plus some smaller checks from businesses and other groups. Citizens for a Sound Economy, which is spearheading opposition to the $1.2 billion tax increase, received one large check from A-Dec, a Newberg dental equipment company.

01/27/2004

Pages