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Revolts Threaten Clinton-Lazio Cease-Fire on Ads

WASHINGTON -- An agreement by Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton and Republican Rick Lazio to discourage "soft money" ads in their Senate race in New York, hailed as a victory for campaign-finance reform, appears to be crumbling before it can begin. On Monday, at least one influential group on each side said it would disregard the deal reached Saturday and feel free to promote its own interests in the campaign.

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Revolts Threaten Clinton-Lazio Cease-Fire on Ads

BY Jim Drinkard, Kathy Kiely

WASHINGTON -- An agreement by Democrat Hillary Rodham Clinton and Republican Rick Lazio to discourage "soft money" ads in their Senate race in New York, hailed as a victory for campaign-finance reform, appears to be crumbling before it can begin. On Monday, at least one influential group on each side said it would disregard the deal reached Saturday and feel free to promote its own interests in the campaign.

09/26/2000
Microsoft Breakup Questioned

The attorney general of North Carolina, one of the states suing Microsoft for antitrust violations, voiced doubts about the government's proposal to break up the company in an interview published Sunday. Meanwhile, prosecutors in court papers Monday blasted most of Microsoft's suggested changes to the breakup proposal, saying they would "frustrate and undermine" the plan. A federal judge is expected to accept the plan within days, after ruling in April that Microsoft used its Windows software monopoly to stifle competition.

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Microsoft Breakup Questioned

BY Paul Davidson

The attorney general of North Carolina, one of the states suing Microsoft for antitrust violations, voiced doubts about the government's proposal to break up the company in an interview published Sunday. Meanwhile, prosecutors in court papers Monday blasted most of Microsoft's suggested changes to the breakup proposal, saying they would "frustrate and undermine" the plan. A federal judge is expected to accept the plan within days, after ruling in April that Microsoft used its Windows software monopoly to stifle competition.

06/06/2000

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