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Special Interests
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Special Interests

BY Judy Sarasohn

Matt Kibbe, executive vice president of Citizens for a Sound Economy, succeeds Paul Beckner as president and chief executive. Beckner is leaving to become senior vice president of Silk Lintott Inc. Kibbe earlier was chief of staff and House Budget Committee associate for then-Rep. Dan Miller (R-Fla.) and director of federal budget policy for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.

06/17/2004
Special Interests
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Special Interests

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights (LCCR) is bolstering its policy and lobbying staff to fight what it sees as "the growing right-wing threat to American civil rights and civil liberties." LCCR Executive Director Wade Henderson says the group has to work harder to "break through the din of war fever and the very legitimate war on terrorism" to get lawmakers' attention on election reform, hate crime and education issues, as well as civil liberties and civil rights. Henderson said the group, a coalition of more than 185 national organizations representing minorities, women, labor unions, gays and lesbians, civil rights activists and others, also is fighting a number of President Bush's judicial nominations, contending that the administration is trying to "pack the court with immoderate judges." "The domestic agenda has operated under a shadow for the past year," he said. "We want to get it back on track." Among LCCR's recent hiring "coups," Henderson said, are Nancy Zirkin, previously director of public policy and government relations for the Association of American University Women, who became LCCR's new deputy director/director of public policy; and Julie Fernandes, previously an attorney at the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, who joined as senior policy analyst/special counsel. Rob Randhava, who joined LCCR last year from the staff of Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.), has become part of the public policy department specializing in immigration issues. Also, Karen McGill Lawsen, executive director of the Leadership Conference Education Fund, took on new duties as LCCR's deputy director for education and operations; Brian Komar moved into the job of director of strategic affairs; Corrine Yu was named director of education; and Ed Fichter, formerly with the Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of Washington, signed on as director of development.

06/17/2004
GOP Senators Push To Pass Spending Bill
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GOP Senators Push To Pass Spending Bill

BY Helen Dewar

Senate Republicans are cranking up pressure for swift passage of a long-overdue $328 billion government spending bill by warning wavering lawmakers that they could lose thousands of home-state projects and face a freeze on expenditures if they block passage of the measure.

01/16/2004
Room for One More Rulemaking Think Tank?
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Room for One More Rulemaking Think Tank?

BY Cindy Skrzycki

There is the Center for Regulatory Effectiveness, the AEI-Brookings Joint Center for Regulatory Studies, the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, the Cato Institute, Citizens for a Sound Economy, the Heritage Foundation, and the Center for Progressive Regulation. Not to mention the lawyers and academics who delve into the regulatory fine print for a living, churning out policy papers, books and research. Does Washington need another regulatory think tank?

01/13/2004
Alabama Tied in Knots by Tax Vote
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Alabama Tied in Knots by Tax Vote

BY Dale Russakoff, Washington Post Staff Writer

Sunday, August 17, 2003; Page A01 PELHAM, Ala. -- Amid suburban sprawl that has obliterated farms and timber stands and even a hideout where the Ku Klux Klan plotted the infamous Birmingham church bombing, Alabama Republican Party Chairman Marty Connors paused on a recent day over hash browns and eggs in a local Cracker Barrel, struggling to make sense of the latest turn in Alabama politics.

08/17/2003
Microsoft to Pay Dividends for the First Time
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Microsoft to Pay Dividends for the First Time

BY Ariana Eunjung Cha

Microsoft Corp. said yesterday that it will issue dividend checks to common stockholders for the first time, a surprise move signaling that the software giant believes its expensive antitrust troubles are coming to an end. Company officials said the board unanimously approved an annual dividend of 16 cents per share. The Redmond, Wash.-based company had previously responded to grumbling by investors about its cash reserves of more than $40 billion by saying it needed to keep the funds because of the uncertainty in its court cases, among other reasons.

01/17/2003
The Hot New Americans Get Hotter
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The Hot New Americans Get Hotter

BY Richard Morin and Claudia Deane

Can the New America Foundation possibly get any hotter? Three of its scholars made the list of new thinkers proclaimed "the best and the brightest" in the current issue of Esquire. Now comes word that all but one of the 13 policy essays in a 36-page special section to appear in the January/February issue of Atlantic Monthly magazine are by writers closely associated with New America. What's more, New America and the Atlantic plan to make the jointly produced "State of the Union" feature into an annual event. "We want this to become an occasion where we assess the real state of the union, what the empirical situation is and ways we can do better to meet the country's needs," said Scott Stossel, Atlantic senior editor. "The actual [presidential] address has become an occasion for empty pomp and circumstance . . . a distillation of the two parties talking past each other. We wanted to cut through that." David Bradley, the policy impresario who owns the Atlantic, National Journal and Hotline, suggested the special relationship with the nonpartisan New America. Bradley is a pal of Ted Halstead, the founder of New America (Halstead also writes the introduction to the section). James Fallows, the Atlantic's national correspondent and its marquee writer, is the chairman of New America's board of directors and writes the concluding essay. In between, a dozen New Americans hold forth on a potpourri of policy prescriptions. Katherine Boo, a senior fellow currently on leave from The Washington Post, offers a battle plan for winning the war on child poverty; the ubiquitous Jedediah Purdy, the New America fellow who has been featured in both the New York Times Magazine and a "Saturday Night Live" sketch, declaims on "social trust"; and Senior Fellow Shannon Brownlee asks whether Americans get too much health care. The only non-New American to make the cut: Jonathan Rauch, a columnist for National Journal and a writer in residence at the Brookings Institution. The writers will be paid standard contributor's rates, Stossel said. New America gets nothing, other than beaucoup exposure, which of course is priceless. The magazine had briefly considered going to Brookings or another nonpartisan tank for talent. But Brookings "is a bit more staid, and we wanted access to fresh and innovative thinking; many of [New America's] fellows are youngish, under 40," Stossel said. "Their basic policy stances squared with ours and they had new, young talent we wanted to take advantage of."

11/26/2002
Social, and Political, Security
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Social, and Political, Security

BY Juliet Eilperin

It seems that every week another political debate erupts over the future of Social Security. Yesterday, it was the partial privatization of the retirement system that prompted a war of words, as two dueling groups are pushing to put lawmakers on the record before the Nov. 5 election. While Democratic congressional leaders are pressuring candidates to oppose creation of individual savings accounts, several GOP interest groups want them to support it, even though, in the face of a plummeting stock market, GOP strategists have quietly urged candidates to play down privatization. A new nonprofit group, Social Security Choice.Org, is launching a $ 500,000 advertising campaign to promote the accounts. Funded by groups including Americans for Tax Reform, Citizens for a Sound Economy, National Taxpayers Union and 60 Plus, it has already signed up 20 congressional candidates who back such a plan. President Bob Costello said the group was gearing up for next year's legislative fight over Social Security. But Democrats are not standing idly by. Yesterday, House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) attacked Costello's group on the floor by name, saying "a coalition of right-wing organizations" is having GOP candidates sign their pledge "in order to give them cover on the issue of privatizing Social Security." Gephardt and Senate Majority Leader Thomas A. Daschle (D-S.D.) will offer a counterpledge at a news conference today with the Campaign for America's Future. It, unsurprisingly, would commit candidates to oppose individual accounts. Gephardt called for a vote on privatization before leaving for the year. "Let's conduct a free and fair debate in the open, in the sunshine, in the public about the consequences that will be caused by the privatization of Social Security."

10/09/2002
Early Wins Embolden Lobbyists for Business
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Early Wins Embolden Lobbyists for Business

BY Dan Morgan and Kathleen Day

Buoyed by their headiest week in recent memory, business lobbyists are dusting off dozens of long-stalled legislative proposals in hopes of cashing in on a new pro-business climate fostered by Republican control of the White House.

03/11/2001
New Congress Could Tackle Important Internet Issues
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New Congress Could Tackle Important Internet Issues

BY Christopher Stern

The new economy kept Congress busy this year. It held more than two dozen Web-related hearings and passed bills increasing the number of foreign high-tech workers allowed to immigrate to the United States and giving electronic contracts the same legal footing as those written in pen and ink. But when the new Congress begins work as early as next month, lobbyists will be stalking the halls on a variety of Internet-related matters, including three key issues: online privacy, Internet taxation and copyright reform.

12/29/2000

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