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Washington, DC 20001

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  • Local 202.783.3870
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Blog

If You Build the Blockchain, Regulators Will Come

The hardest part of drafting any new regulation is establishing a definition. In fact, most of the policy work is in the definition and there are alarmingly few policy considerations after something is defined as a covered entity. The definition of cryptocurrency has already proved problematic for regulators. Essentially, to commodities regulators, virtual currency is a commodity. For bank regulators, it is a bank. For securities regulators, it is a security. For those who regulate money transmitters, it is a money transmitter. For the purpose of property taxes, it is a property. Everyone wants a stake in the new world of virtual currency.

07/12/2016
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Blog

Health Regulations Stifle Innovation, Raise Costs

For decades, the costs of providing health care services have escalated. Congress passed ObamaCare, in part, as a supposed way to control these rising costs. However, the health care market was heavily regulated before ObamaCare. The increased regulations from ObamaCare have not prevented costs from rising, they only work to hamper innovations, which lead to bloated costs.

07/24/2015
On Batman and Superpowers
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Blog

On Batman and Superpowers

 su·per·he·ro   /ˈso͞opərˌhi(ə)rō/ Noun: A benevolent fictional character with superhuman powers. By its very definition, a superhero is someone who possesses something extraordinary. 

05/01/2013
MPAA vs. Consumers
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Blog

MPAA vs. Consumers

Closing arguments were heard in San Francisco today in a case brought by the Hollywood studios to ban RealDVD from the market.  The Motion Picture Association of America made it clear that it beleives consumers have no right to copy legally purchased DVDs.  In their view, "One copy is a violation of the DMCA [Digital Millennium Copyright Act]."  Should Hollywood prevail, the DMCA will trump Fair Use doctrine, that has balanced consumer's uses of content with the rights of the content providers.  For an update, check "Fair Use or No Use?"

05/21/2009
Fair Use or No Use?
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Press Release

Fair Use or No Use?

Last fall, RealNetworks launched a new product, RealDVD, allowing users to legally save a copy of any DVD that they own. However, in what appears to be an ongoing war with consumers, the motion picture studios—including Disney, Paramount, Sony, Twentieth Century Fox, Warner Bros., and Viacom—have filed a lawsuit against RealNetworks to have the new product banned. Within a week of its unveiling, the studios had a temporary restraining order in place, removing the product from the market.

05/21/2009