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In Action

Politicians Face Market Woes
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Press Release

Politicians Face Market Woes

The great bull market has ended. Hindsight is 20/20, but we should have seen it coming when Al Gore lost the 2000 presidential election. The ride began in 1994 and for almost eight years it was a heck of ride. The era allowed for free spending, low interest rates, and budget surpluses.

07/23/2002
California’s Latest Endangered Species: SUVs
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Press Release

California’s Latest Endangered Species: SUVs

This week, California’s Gov. Gray Davis signed into law the first measure that regulates carbon dioxide emissions from cars, trucks, and SUVs. The tough new standards take the debate over global warming off of the blackboard and into the daily lives of many Americans. While Californians are clearly affected, environmentalists are hoping to use California as an example to push other states into adopting the tough standards as well. The only problem is that the debate over global warming and human influences on climate are far from settled. Which means that consumers may have to endure costly new mandates and changes in their daily lives with little or no environmental improvements.

07/23/2002
Stop the Kennedy Tax Hike
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Press Release

Stop the Kennedy Tax Hike

Washington, DC – Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) delivered more than 15,000 letters from its members and activists to members of the Senate and House of Representatives urging them to take a stand against Senator Ted Kennedy’s (D- MA) attempts to roll back President Bush’s tax cuts of 2001. Since this historic tax cut was passed into law, Senator Kennedy has been one of its most vocal critics and has continually sought ways to resurrect taxes that punish savings and investment, such as the Death Tax. The “Stop the Kennedy Tax Hike” effort was launched by CSE earlier this year in a mailing to its membership asking them to contact their elected officials about this important issue. Within just a few weeks, CSE was inundated with thousands of signed letters urging legislators not to water down any portion of the tax relief provided by President Bush – a clear sign to Congress of the broad based support for these tax cuts and the demand to make them permanent. At their headquarters in Washington, D.C. CSE staff sorted through the multitude of letters, and in late July presented all 535 members of Congress with their own pile of constituent mail asking them to support the tax cut and keep government big-spenders like Ted Kennedy away from it. This isn’t the first time Senator Kennedy and other tax and spend liberals have heard from CSE regarding this issue. In January, CSE took to the streets to protest against Senator Kennedy’s speech at the National Press Club where he made his first official call to repeal the tax cut. CSE’s work against Senator Kennedy was featured in the bi-weekly publication Roll Call and in the Washington Times. As letters continue to roll in, CSE will continue to deliver them with the hope that legislators will consider the concerns and interests of their constituents before they consider repealing or diluting tax cuts that all Americans deserve. Click here for more information on activities on the Kennedy Tax Hike.

07/23/2002
Republican Enters Race for House District 55
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Republican Enters Race for House District 55

BY Rob Shapard

HILLSBOROUGH - Kathy Hartkopf, an active Orange County Republican and self-described fiscal conservative, filed Monday to run for the state House of Representatives. Hartkopf is running in the newly created House District 55, which includes 12 precincts in central and northern Orange County and all of Person County. She's the sole Republican to file in the new district in the filing period that started Friday, along with two Democrats - Ken Rothrock, an attorney from northern Orange; and Rep. Gordon Allen, a Person County Democrat who currently serves in House District 22. Allen, whose current district includes Person and parts of Granville, Vance, Warren, Halifax and Franklin counties, also filed Monday for the 55th District. The precincts in Orange County that are part of the 55th District include Hillsborough, West Hillsborough, Grady Brown, Cameron Park, Eno, Cedar Grove, Caldwell, Cheeks, Efland, St. Marys, Tolars and Carr. Hartkopf lives on Uphill Court in the Cornwallis Hills subdivision in southern Hillsborough with her husband, Al, and two daughters. Al Hartkopf also is running for elected office this year, seeking a seat on the Orange County school board. Kathy Hartkopf has been the spokeswoman for Citizens for a Better Way, a local group that formed last year and campaigned against the $ 75 million bond package in Orange County, which the voters ended up approving in November. The group argued in part that the bond package was too large, dollar-wise, given persistent doubts about the health of the economy. Hartkopf said last year that, in spite of the fact that one of her daughters attends Hillsborough Elementary, she would vote against the bond package, which included $ 900,000 for renovations at Hillsborough Elementary as part of $ 47 million for county and city schools. She said she felt the renovations were needed, but that she couldn't support the entire schools bond referendum. Kathy Hartkopf also has helped establish a local chapter of the Citizens for a Sound Economy, a group based in Washington, D.C., that has regional offices and calls for lower taxes and limited government. "I believe my candidacy represents an opportunity for the values of the people of northern Orange and Person counties to be heard in the North Carolina General Assembly," Hartkopf said in a statement. "I am proud to be known as a fiscal conservative. I look forward to continuing this ideology and this work on the state level. Just as we do in our own homes, our state must function within its means." Hartkopf grew up in Pamlico County and was active in 4-H, and she remains a lifetime member of the North Carolina 4-H Honor Club. She graduated from Peace College and was a fellow of the Institute of Political Leadership at UNC-Wilmington. She also is a member of the Orange County Republican Party executive committee, president of the Regulator Republican Women, president of the Duke Memorial Weekday School Parents Council, chairwoman of the fund-raising committee for Hillsborough Elementary PTA and a member of that PTA's executive board and director of the Parent's Morning Out program at Calvary United Methodist Church. Unless another Republican joins the race for the 55th House seat, Hartkopf will face the winner of the Sept. 10 Democratic primary that will include Allen, Rothrock and any other Democrat who files for the 55th. Allen said Monday that he believed many of the issues that concern his constituents in District 22 are similar to those in central and northern Orange County. He specifically mentioned economic development and education. "The problems that [Orange residents] have are the same problems that Person has, and also the other five counties I'm serving right now," he said. "The issues are very similar. "Education, of course, is the biggest issue that affects all of us," he said. "Recruiting teachers, finding teachers. We're producing 3,000 teachers a year, and we need 10,000." Allen, 73, lives on Crestwood Drive in Roxboro and was principal owner of the family insurance business, Thompson-Allen Inc., until recently, when his son took over ownership. He is a combat veteran of the Korean War and has five children and 17 grandchildren. Allen is in his third House term, and also served three terms in the N.C. Senate in the 1970s. He said Monday that Orange County wouldn't be new to him, in part because his district during his first two Senate terms included Orange, Person and Durham counties. Allen currently is co-chairman of the House Finance Committee, and serves on the Education, Environment and Natural Resources, Legislative Redistricting, Rules and Transportation committees. Allen also is a member of the education subcommittee on community colleges. He is a trustee of Piedmont Community College in Roxboro, and helped lead the effort to create the school about 30 years ago. Allen said he would support the creation in Orange County of a satellite campus for Durham Technical Community College. Both the Orange County Commissioners and Durham Tech officials have committed to creating the satellite campus within the next four years, and they are beginning the process of choosing a site. "The community colleges are one of the finest things that have ever happened to North Carolina," Allen said.

07/23/2002
Candidates Enter Races for New House Districts
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Candidates Enter Races for New House Districts

BY C. D. Kirkpatrick

Candidates for state House and Senate seats filed Monday and Friday under new legislative maps drawn by a judge after the original maps were thrown out by the state Supreme Court. The filing period reopened Friday morning, and is expected to run eight days. The new House and Senate seats are now single-member districts, instead of the larger multi-member areas that the court struck down. House District 32 Democrat Bernard Holliday of Creedmoor filed to run for the new House District 32 seat. The district covers Granville County, a northern section of Durham County and a southern section of Vance County. The 70-year-old ordained minister ran in the last two election cycles in races that did not affect Durham County. Holliday said Monday that the Legislature needs to have the "internal discipline" to run shorter sessions and to be more fiscally responsible. The state Department of Public Instruction needs more staffing to monitor the progress of children in all facets of education, including those who are home schooled, he said. "Education is still critical," he said. "We've got a major problem in our state." He pointed out that a recent court decision said that the state has the responsibility to educate all children. "I think there are too many gaps, there's not enough staff in the [Department of Public Instruction]," he said. "And let's not forget our fiscal situation. We need to revisit the tax structure in our state." House District 55 Kathy Hartkopf, an Orange County Republican, filed Monday to run for state House District 55, which covers 12 precincts in central and northern Orange County and all of Person County. The self-described fiscal conservative joins two Democrats: Ken Rothrock, a Hillsborough attorney who filed Friday, and Rep. Gordon Allen, a Person County Democrat who currently serves in House District 22, and who filed Monday. Allen's current district includes Person and parts of Granville, Vance, Warren, Halifax and Franklin counties. Hartkopf has been the spokeswoman for Citizens for a Better Way, a local group that formed last year and campaigned against the $ 75 million bond package in Orange County, which the voters ended up approving in November. The group argued in part that the bond package was too large, dollar-wise, given persistent doubts about the health of the economy. Hartkopf said last year that, in spite of the fact that one of her daughters attends Hillsborough Elementary, she would vote against the bond package, which included $ 900,000 for renovations at Hillsborough Elementary as part of $ 47 million for county and city schools. She said she felt the renovations were needed, but that she couldn't support the entire schools bond referendum. Kathy Hartkopf also has helped establish a local chapter of the Citizens for a Sound Economy, a group based in Washington, D.C., that has regional offices and calls for lower taxes and limited government. "I believe my candidacy represents an opportunity for the values of the people of northern Orange and Person counties to be heard in the North Carolina General Assembly," Hartkopf said in a statement. "I am proud to be known as a fiscal conservative. I look forward to continuing this ideology and this work on the state level. Just as we do in our own homes, our state must function within its means." Unless another Republican joins the race, Hartkopf will face the winner of the Sept. 10 Democratic primary that will include Allen, Rothrock and any other Democrat who files for the 55th. Allen said Monday that he believed many of the issues that concerned his constituents in District 22 were similar to those in central and northern Orange County. He specifically mentioned economic development and education. "The problems that [Orange residents] have are the same problems that Person has, and also the other five counties I'm serving right now," he said. "The issues are very similar. "Education, of course, is the biggest issue that affects all of us," he said. "Recruiting teachers, finding teachers. We're producing 3,000 teachers a year, and we need 10,000." Allen, 73, lives on Crestwood Drive in Roxboro and was principal owner of the family insurance business, Thompson-Allen Inc., until recently, when his son took over ownership. He is a combat veteran of the Korean War and has five children and 17 grandchildren. Allen is in his third House term, and also served three terms in the N.C. Senate in the 1970s. He said Monday that Orange County wouldn't be new to him, in part because his district during his first two Senate terms included Orange, Person and Durham counties. Allen currently is co-chairman of the House Finance Committee, and serves on the Education, Environment and Natural Resources, Legislative Redistricting, Rules and Transportation committees. Like Allen, Rothrock, 52, said residents of northern Orange County and Person County share the same concerns. "The people in these precincts are homogeneous; we think alike," he said. Rothrock said he would be a good candidate because of his contacts in both counties. The attorney and 1985 Hillsborough mayoral candidate owns land in Person County and has many clients there, he said. Also, his wife is from Person County, he said. "I've always felt a need to be involved with public service," he said. Other races State House Democratic incumbents Paul Luebke, Mickey Michaux and Paul Miller filed for their new respective Durham seats, districts 30, 31 and 29. The three redrawn districts are inside the county borders. State Senate Democratic incumbents Wib Gulley and Jeanne Lucas filed for their respective seats under the new state Senate map, Districts 18 and 20. District 18 covers part of Durham and all of Person and Granville counties. Senate District 20 was designed as a minority district and is inside the county borders. Non-legislative races, unaffected by the redistricting lawsuit brought by the GOP, do not have new filing periods. The new primary date is set for Sept. 10. The May 7 primary was delayed by the lawsuit. The general election is scheduled for Nov. 5.

07/23/2002
Bush Administration Criticizes Israeli Missile Attack
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Bush Administration Criticizes Israeli Missile Attack

BY Phil Donahue

07/23/2002
Chamber of Commerce will Support County's 2% Bed Tax
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Chamber of Commerce will Support County's 2% Bed Tax

BY Jim Turner

STUART - The Stuart/Martin County Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors will support the hospitality industry's efforts for a county 2 percent bed tax. "This effort is a wonderful example of a users' tax, which this chamber endorses over the option of taxing business," said Joe Catrambone, president of the chamber. The chamber opposed a similar referendum in 1995 but is now "confident this board of commissioners will use the funds as intended," Catrambone said. County voters will be asked on Sept. 10 to approve a tax plan that would add 2 percent to the cost of staying at a hotel, condominium or other short-term accommodation. The tax is opposed by the county chapter of Citizens for a Sound Economy and the Republican Executive Committee in Martin County because "government money shouldn't be going into private industry," according to the groups. The tax plan is expected to generate about $665,000 in the first year - going into effect Nov. 1 if approved in September - and possibly more than $1.2 million annually by 2007, chamber officials said. Money generated by the tax would be used to market the county's tourism opportunities.

07/23/2002
SBOE Members, Citizens Make Impact at SBOE Hearing
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Press Release

SBOE Members, Citizens Make Impact at SBOE Hearing

CSE members from across Texas testified before the State Board of Education on Wednesday, July 17. The 31 CSE representatives comprised the largest group at the hearing. The central resounding theme was that Texans demand that patriotism, free markets and democracy be taught to our children and we will not tolerate “revisionist” history or books which have propaganda.

07/22/2002
Texas Wrangles Over Bias In School Textbooks
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Texas Wrangles Over Bias In School Textbooks

BY Kris Axtman

What if a junior-high school textbook wrongly stated that John Marshall was the United States' first Supreme Court Chief Justice, instead of John Jay? Or that the Louisiana Purchase occurred in 1804, not 1803? No one would fault textbook publishers for fixing factual errors likethese found in recent textbooks.

07/22/2002
Dozens of Texans Try to Help Write History at Textbook Hearing
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Dozens of Texans Try to Help Write History at Textbook Hearing

BY Jim Suydam

Some spoke of a failure to mention the religious beliefs of the founding fathers. A busload of students from the University of Texas at Brownsville bemoaned the lack of Hispanics. One man argued that what he called the "violent nature" of Muslims should be included. Drawn by the chance to influence what the state's schoolchildren read when they open up their history and social studies books next year, dozens of Texans from across the state testified before the State Board of Education on Wednesday. In November, the board will vote on more than 150 proposed social studies and history texts, selecting which ones Texas school districts may choose from for the next six years. "I don't expect that the board will reject any of them," said board Chairwoman Grace Shore, R-Longview. As the more than 67 speakers came before the board, a general consensus emerged from the politically disparate group: The textbooks just need a little more history in them. Publishers appear to have followed the curriculum elements that the state requires, said Chris Patterson of the Texas Public Policy Foundation. But in following the state's guidelines, critics said, the books have omitted crucial aspects of history not specifically asked for by the state and lost the narrative line that makes history so compelling. "As one of our reviewers noted, these books are just one damn fact after another," Patterson said. The foundation, a pro-business group, paid nearly $100,000 for a review of the drafts of the books, which it says found more than 500 errors. There's plenty that needs to be added to the books, each of which already weigh in at about 10 pounds, said Jose Angel Gutierrez, a professor at the University of Texas at Arlington, who spoke of the need to tell students more about the influence of Spain and Hispanics in American history. "Mexico is not even discussed in the section on North America," he said, referring to a sixth-grade text on world cultures and geography. Maria Louisa Garza came from Corpus Christi to ask the board to make publishers include the names of those killed in the Alamo. As a child, Garza said, she felt bad about the Alamo. "The battle of the Alamo had always been an us-against-them thing, and I was on the wrong side," she said. But when she visited it as an adult and saw the names of the Hispanics killed in the fight against Santa Anna's tyranny, she "finally felt like a fully franchised Texan," she said. More than 20 speakers from Citizens for a Sound Economy, another pro-business group, asked that more be included about the American Revolution and capitalism. The books have too much about socialist Karl Marx and not enough about classic liberal John Locke, one said. But unlike in past years, Citizens for a Sound Economy and the Texas Public Policy Foundation will not be asking that any books be rejected, both groups said. Publishers attending the meeting said they would respond in writing to all of the concerns raised at the meeting. Joe Bill Watkins, an Austin attorney who represents the American Association of Publishers, said that although it would be great to add much of what was asked for in the hearing, it's not fair to ask publishers to rewrite their books at this point. "If they've covered the (curriculum required by the state) then they've done what's required," Watkins said. If there are things that should be covered, then the Legislature needs to change its requirements, he said.

07/18/2002

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