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Issue Analysis 82 - Clinton's Social Security Fix: Right Rhetoric, Wrong Solution
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Press Release

Issue Analysis 82 - Clinton's Social Security Fix: Right Rhetoric, Wrong Solution

Bill Clinton’s January 19th State of the Union Address did much to make Americans more comfortable with the notion that Social Security’s future is dependent upon investing some portion of it in real assets, not paper IOUs, and that workers must be given a choice in how their retirement dollars are to be invested. While these are two sound ideas, he unfortunately came short of fully embracing them. Perhaps out of political necessity, Clinton bowed to his political left by splitting private investment and personal savings accounts apart, opting for a big-government approach to both of these concepts.

01/29/1999
CSE Foundation Finds that American Consumers Question the Government's Case Against Microsoft
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Press Release

CSE Foundation Finds that American Consumers Question the Government's Case Against Microsoft

At a press conference on the steps of the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) Chairman and former Bush White House Counsel C. Boyden Gray and CSE Foundation's Executive Vice President Matt Kibbe released the results of a Wirthlin Worldwide poll that indicates American consumers are skeptical of the government's case against Microsoft.

01/07/1999
Should Government Help the Tortoise Beat the Hare?
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Press Release

Should Government Help the Tortoise Beat the Hare?

The past year has seen Microsoft make headlines across the country, and not just for its new and innovative products. The software giant has found itself the target of an antitrust case by the Department of Justice in conjunction with a number of state attorneys general. The government claims that Microsoft is acting anti-competitively by using its operating system, Windows, as leverage to dominate the market for Internet browsers. However, the government case ignores the fact that computer prices are plummeting and innovation is booming. Consumers can now educate themselves, shop, and even plan their next vacation through their computers. In a situation where prices are falling and consumer benefits are increasing, what is Microsoft's crime? After assessing the dynamics of the marketplace, South Carolina's attorney general, Charlie Condon, dropped out of the case against Microsoft stating, "Innovation should be left to entrepreneurs, not to government bureaucrats or to the courts." Indeed, it is hard to find the benefit to consumers of giving the people who brought us snail mail responsibility over the information superhighway.

12/21/1998
Capitol Comment 219 - Governors and State Legislators are Shooting Consumers in the Foot With Health Insurance Regulations
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 219 - Governors and State Legislators are Shooting Consumers in the Foot With Health Insurance Regulations

As states look for ways to improve health care quality and affordability, many are turning to increased regulation — which does the opposite. Whether intended to expand access to particular types of coverage (health benefit mandates), require health insurers to take all comers (guaranteed issue), or make coverage affordable through price controls (community rating), health insurance regulations actually increase costs and restrict access to coverage. Health insurance regulation is growing at an explosive rate.

12/17/1998
Capitol Comment 217 - Microsoft and Monopoly
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 217 - Microsoft and Monopoly

Over the past year, Microsoft has made headlines across the country, and not just for its new and innovative products. The software giant has been the target of an antitrust case by the Department of Justice (DOJ). The government claims that Microsoft is acting anti-competitively by using its operating system, Windows, as leverage to dominate the market for Internet browsers. Before intervening in one of the most dynamic sectors of the economy, the DOJ must demonstrate that Microsoft is a monopolist rather than a successful company in a fiercely competitive market.

12/14/1998
Letter from CSE Foundation and CEI to FCC Chairman William Kennard regarding the FCC's role with regard to several pending merge
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Press Release

Letter from CSE Foundation and CEI to FCC Chairman William Kennard regarding the FCC's role with regard to several pending merge

Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation 1250 H Street, N.W. Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20005 Phone: (202) 783-3870 Competitive Enterprise Institute 1001 Connecticut Avenue, N.W. Suite 1250 Washington, D.C. 20036 Phone: (202) 331-1010 December 11, 1998 The Honorable William Kennard Chairman Federal Communications Commission 1919 M St., N.W. Washington, D.C. 20554 Dear Chairman Kennard:

12/11/1998
Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation Applauds South Carolina’s Attorney General Charlie Condon for Withdrawing from Microsoft
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Press Release

Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation Applauds South Carolina’s Attorney General Charlie Condon for Withdrawing from Microsoft

"South Carolina’s attorney general, Charlie Condon, has done consumers and taxpayers a great service by withdrawing from the government’s case against Microsoft," according to Paul Beckner, president of Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation. Commenting on Attorney General Condon’s Dec. 7 announcement, Beckner said, "It’s hard to claim that consumers are being hurt when prices are plummeting and innovation is booming."

12/07/1998
Capitol Comment 215 - Do Rail Mergers Mean Higher Rates?
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 215 - Do Rail Mergers Mean Higher Rates?

The railroad industry has undergone a large number of mergers since 1981, which has raised fears of monopolization. Some economists and most politicians equate the number of competitors or degree of industry concentration with the robustness of competition. They reason that, as mergers leave more shippers served by only one railroad, surely higher rail rates must follow.

11/20/1998
Capitol Comment 214 - Railroad Competitive Access: Re-Regulation in Cheap Clothing
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Capitol Comment

Capitol Comment 214 - Railroad Competitive Access: Re-Regulation in Cheap Clothing

By most measures, railroad deregulation under the Staggers Act of 1980 has been a resounding success. The Staggers Act lowered real rail rates on most commodities by 15 percent to 25 percent, saved shippers $11 billion to 18 billion annually due to lower rates and more timely service, and staved off a massive taxpayer bailout of an industry that was a financial basket case.1

11/19/1998
The Moral Case for Social Security Privatization
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Press Release

The Moral Case for Social Security Privatization

The most important arguments for Social Security privatization are moral, not economic. Privatization would not be justifiable if it were economically beneficial but morally suspect. However, a privatized Social Security system meets moral criteria far better than does our current, bankrupt, pay-as-you-go system. A privatized Social Security system gives individuals more freedom to run their lives, is fairer, provides more security, and creates less antagonism between generations, fostering a greater sense of community.

10/29/1998

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