Citizens Rally in Defense of Judge’s Salmon Ruling

In a victory for sound science, a federal judge in Eugene recently ruled that the National Marine and Fisheries Service (NMFS) could no longer list Oregon coastal coho salmon as endangered. U.S. District Judge Michael R. Hogan ruled that NMFS erred by not including hatchery- bred salmon in determining endangered species listings. The federal government, NMFS, and environmental groups are considering appealing the case.

Members of Citizens for a Sound Economy (CSE) throughout the west, especially in Oregon and Washington, have rallied to show that real people support and demand the use of common-sense science and do not want to see this decision appealed.

In a little more than one week, a joint effort by CSE and Oregonians in Action (OIA) has produced almost 1,400 activist emails to the Bush Administration and thousands of calls into regional NMFS offices.

Russ Walker, director of Oregon Citizens for a Sound Economy, issued the following statement:

“This Federal Judge in Eugene made the right decision. All over the northwest more and more salmon are returning to spawn, yet there are more than two-dozen salmon breeds listed as endangered. Oregon CSE will continue to be organized and vocal on this issue, ensuring the government makes the soundest decision possible. Extreme environmentalists from all over the country, from as far away as Delaware, are pressuring the Bush Administration to appeal this decision that affects our very way of life here in the Northwest. That’s why we are ensuring that the administration hears from citizens who have been careful stewards of Northwest land for generations.

“Farmers in the Klamath Basin were denied water by the federal government this year all in the name of these coho salmon. CSE and OIA are organized to fight for sound environmental and economic policies and will defend common-sense decisions just like this one.”

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